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Monday, May 28
 

7:00am AKDT

Registration Opens
Monday May 28, 2018 7:00am - 7:30am AKDT
2nd Floor Foyer

7:30am AKDT

Hatha Yoga (30 min.)
Classic yoga postures (asanas) that move with your breath to help you reduce stress and increase strength and flexibility. These classes are approximately 50% stretching poses and 50% strengthening and toning poses, all combined with proper breathing and grounding techniques.

*All levels welcome!
*Yoga mats provided or feel free to bring your own
*Wear your yoga gear or something comfortable to stretch in

Moderators
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Monday May 28, 2018 7:30am - 8:00am AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

7:30am AKDT

Breakfast
BREAKFAST BUFFET

Fresh Fruit & Fibre Muffins with Butter & Fruit Preserves (V)
Fresh Cut Seasonal Fruits, Melons, Berries
Breakfast Potatoes with Peppers & Sauteed Onions
Farm Fresh Scrambled Eggs with Cheese & Scallions
Ham

Beverages: 
Chilled Fresh Orange, Apple & Grapefruit Juice
Freshly Brewed Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee & Teas

Monday May 28, 2018 7:30am - 9:00am AKDT
Ballroom 1

8:00am AKDT

8:15am AKDT

Mini Yoga Break (15 min.)
  • Enjoy a 15 minute Mini Yoga Break (chair and standing Yoga). These are a great pick-me-up to help rejuvenate your mind and body.
  • Business attire is suitable for the class.
  • Relieves neck and shoulder tension, back pain and tight hips.
  • Transforms fatigue to alertness, stamina and greater productivity.
  • Boosts concentration to more effectively absorb the material being presented.

*All levels welcome!


Moderators
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Monday May 28, 2018 8:15am - 8:30am AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

8:30am AKDT

Childcare Opens
Monday May 28, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am AKDT
- Room 440 (4th Floor)

8:45am AKDT

Quiet Reflection & Meditation Drop-in
This is an open time/space for quiet reflection and/or meditation.

Festival attendees are invited to drop in for any length of time. 

We encourage people to "check their devices" at the door, but portable devices with headphones to support your meditation or other quiet reflective practices are permitted. 

Monday May 28, 2018 8:45am - 12:00pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

9:00am AKDT

BCOEL Meeting
Monday May 28, 2018 9:00am - 9:30am AKDT
Port of Vancouver

9:00am AKDT

Keynote: Jesse Stommel
Livestream:  https://zoom.us/j/188472669

Log in to the meeting link prior to the session to check the compatibility of your computer Please note that this Zoom conference will want you to download and fill out an attendee profile. This will you only need to do once for all future Zoom web conferencing. Note: No long distance is required, use your computer's audio. 
Keep your microphone on mute
 It is preset to stay MUTED and if is turned on there is a chance that feedback will occur. 

Get comfortable, sit back and enjoy the live presentation
If you miss the session don’t worry; we will post a video online for later viewing at your convenience.

Questions for the presenter
Please tweet to us using the hashtag #FoL18 and we will pass your questions along to the keynote.

Speakers
avatar for Jesse Stommel

Jesse Stommel

Executive Director, DTLT, University of Mary Washington
Irascibly optimistic. Film, critical digital pedagogy, public humanities. Fan of One Word Sentences. Feminist.


Monday May 28, 2018 9:00am - 10:15am AKDT
Ballroom 1

10:15am AKDT

Break
Snack: Pinnacle Trail Mix (V, VG, DF, GF) 

Beverages: Freshly Brewed Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee & Teas

Monday May 28, 2018 10:15am - 10:30am AKDT
2nd Floor Foyer

10:30am AKDT

From Idea to Scale: Empowering Learners and Educators to Inform Shared Educational Technology
Large higher educational organizations worldwide have invested in infrastructure which supports online and technology-enabled learning opportunities at higher education institutions. For large consortia in Canada and the United States, shared educational technologies present a number of opportunities, not least of which is significant cost savings for institutions and government. In 2017, the government of Ontario tasked eCampusOntario with executing a 3-year pilot of Lynda.com on behalf of all institutions in the province. This decision set eCampusOntario on a path towards shared licensing of educational technology and the development of shared infrastructure.

This presentation will consider eCampusOntario’s approach for the provision of shared educational technology. What principles shape these decisions? How do we ensure that a technology or practice will support ethical considerations and principles of access, choice and flexibility for learners and educators?

The eCampusOntario approach is characterized by the cultivation of learner and educator communities which trickle up to inform decision making at a systemic level. These spaces prioritize the empowerment of learners and educators to connect, experiment and explore the intersection between technology and learning in an open environment. This presentation will feature two key projects: eCampusOntario Student Experience Design (SXD) Lab and the Ontario Extend Professional Development Framework.

Through the cultivation of these educator and learner driven networks, eCampusOntario is better positioned to move from idea to scale, execute system-wide shared technology and infrastructure projects, and ultimately keep pace with the changing environment of higher education.

Speakers

Monday May 28, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am AKDT
Port of San Francisco

10:30am AKDT

Advocating for OERs: A Student Perspective
A central campaign of the BC Federation of Students (BCFS) advocates for the widespread implementation of OERs on campuses across the province. Students recognize the rising costs of textbooks are representative of an education system with increasing financial barriers. This presentation will include a detailed overview on the BCFS campaign, from the initial stages of identifying access to open resources as a fundamental issue for students, to its development in collaboration with students across multiple institutions. Presenters will illustrate how the campaign operates at micro-levels (tool-kits for institutions) and macro-levels (provincial lobby meetings), and will discuss the challenges and solutions to both. The session will conclude with a discussion of how students, faculty, staff, and senior administration can work better together to achieve common goals. The session would be beneficial for those interested in students’ perspectives on open educational resources, and for those wanted to learn about advocating with students and student organizations.

The BC Federation of Students represents post-secondary students at 13 institutions in every region of BC including the Kootenays, the Lower Mainland, Vancouver Island, and northern BC. For more than 40 years, the BCFS has advocated on a breadth of issues that are of concern to post-secondary students. Most recently, BCFS advocacy resulted in the elimination of tuition fees for adult basic education and English Language Learning, and in the reduction of interest on student loans.

Speakers
avatar for Aran Armutlu

Aran Armutlu

BC Federation of Students
Aran is the Chairperson of the BC Federation of Students which represents students at 13 colleges and universities all across BC. You can find him on Twitter @AranTheArmenian The Federation’s primary purpose is to work for an affordable, accessible, high quality, and public... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am AKDT
Port of New York

10:30am AKDT

An Adventure into Creation of OER: A STEM Wiki Project
Removing financial barriers to undergraduate education is crucial, and the creation of open educational resources (OER) will directly help. And not only would the resources developed benefit the students as they are taking the class, but also by making the material open, it could be used by other faculty and students, not only at your institution but beyond.

 In an appreciation of my financially unburden educational experience, I have explored what I can do to help the students to access the required learning materials. There is no open text(s) available that can be used for this course. To this end, I have created the resources in an open educational environment.

In this session, I will be walking you through my experience of creating open educational resources for a mathematics course at the Mount Royal University, Calgary.

The session will discuss the following:
  • how you can contribute to, 
  • the care needed for the developing material and sustain the material,
  • how to benefit from,
  • how to adapt the content,
  • how to prepare whatever else may be required to run a course, 
  • how to engage students, 
  • how to mentor undergraduate teaching assistants.
Participant will be involved in the discussion using google forms and other active learning tools.

Reference:
https://math.libretexts.org/LibreTexts/Mount_Royal_University/MATH_1150%3A_Mathematical_Reasoning

Speakers
avatar for Pamini Thangarajah

Pamini Thangarajah

Associate Professor, Mount Royal University
PAMINI THANGARAJAH is an associate professor at the Department of Mathematics and Computing, Mount Royal University(MRU), Calgary, Alberta, Canada. She has developed several mathematics courses and two minor programs. Further, she is one of the organizers of Explore STEM, a one-day... Read More →



Monday May 28, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am AKDT
Port of Hong Kong

10:30am AKDT

Set for Success: Multi-institutional Perspectives on Orientation for International Students
For a number of reasons students from all corners of the world choose to study outside of their home country. This decision to study abroad offers international students the potential for exceptional learning experiences and at the same time presents challenges such as “feelings of uneasiness, insecurity, and loss” (Yakunina, Weigold, Weigold, Hercegovac & Elsayed, 2013). In addition to these complex feelings is the growing diversity of cultures and languages on most western college and university campuses resulting in robust but intricate learning environments requiring the attention of educators, support services and curriculum developers (Fischer, 2011; Murphy, Hawkes & Law, 2002).

This session looks at four different approaches to student orientation and how that coordination helps to address the overarching globalized post-secondary environment. Within these different orientation models emerge commonalities with the international student’s emotional well-being, academic success and overall positive transition at the centre.

If you have international students at your institution, ensuring they are accomplished, contented and established individuals is most likely at the forefront of your mind. Our team of presenters have collaborated to bring to you our stories of trials and triumphs. At this session you’ll also have opportunities to share your stories through interactive activities.

Join us and see what may fit your student and institution needs. 

Speakers
avatar for Tammie Clarke

Tammie Clarke

Nursing Instructor and Educational Developer, Selkirk College
avatar for Karen Densky

Karen Densky

Associate Teaching Professor/TESL Coordinator Faculty of Education and Social Work, Thompson Rivers University
Karen Densky holds a PhD in Education in Curriculum Theory and Implementation (Simon Fraser University) and an MA in Education in Curriculum and Instruction (Simon Fraser University). Her teaching areas are in English language and teacher education. Karen’s research areas include... Read More →
avatar for Bryan Smith

Bryan Smith

Learning Experience Designer, UVIC, Technology Integrated Learning
I help staff and faculty to design and develop online and blended courses, and I provide advice and resources for incorporating technology into the classroom.
avatar for Maureen Wideman

Maureen Wideman

Associate Vice President, Teaching and Learning, University of the Fraser Valley
Maureen has spent more than 25 years in the teaching and learning field beginning as an instructional designer, faculty member, director and now AVP. She approaches faculty development as a student success initiative and maintains the learner-centred approach in all she does. Her... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am AKDT
Port of Singapore

10:30am AKDT

Caring for Privacy in BC Higher Education: Navigating FIPPA When Using Web 2.0 & the Cloud
Note: This is a 3-hour session - the first half (90 min) is before lunch, and the second half (90 min) is after lunch. 

Web 2.0 and cloud-based tools offer many opportunities for teaching and learning in higher education; however, the benefits must be weighed against the risks. Often the privacy issues associated with these tools are not well understood—especially in the context of BC public higher education under the constraints of BC’s Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA; RSBC 1996, C-165). BC’s FIPPA is acknowledged to be one of the strictest privacy frameworks in Canada—and is arguably the strictest North America. Although some educators successfully navigate these constraints, others avoid these useful tools altogether—or worse—use them without attempting to comply with FIPPA. Prof. Julia Hengstler has spent the last 5 years advising her faculty and graduate students—as well as educators in the K-12 sector---to use Web 2.0 and cloud-based tools in ways that respect the privacy expectations embedded in BC’s FIPPA. Speaking from her experience as professor, faculty-embedded educational technologist, Research Ethics Board (REB) member, and Ph.D. student researching FIPPA compliance in BC public education, Hengstler will address how professors and their universities can work together to demonstrate care and respect for student privacy while using Web 2.0 and cloud-based tools. Hengstler will also highlight considerations for REBs reviewing research proposals including use of similar tools. Attendees will learn key FIPPA considerations in the context of Web 2.0 and cloud-based tool use and practical strategies for addressing them. The session includes a presentation, as well as a question and answer period followed by a strategic planning exercise for attendees. Handouts/resources will be provided.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Hengstler

Julia Hengstler

Professor/Educational Technologist/Chair Ctr for Education & CyberHumanity, Vancouver Island University
Julia is the Educational Technologist with the Faculty of Education at Vancouver Island University & an Instructor in Educational Technology. Julia has a broad instructional background teaching students from grade 6 to adult in both traditional and non-traditional contexts. Her subject... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm AKDT
Tuscany Room

10:30am AKDT

Cultivating Trust and Emotional Safety in Educational Environments
Many educational institutions are grappling with the troubling rise of mental health challenges within their communities. Issues such as depression and anxiety are becoming increasingly common not only within the student population but also among instructors and educational administrators, many of whom find their collegial environments to be fraught with new hurdles involving the care and wellness of people.

Bedrock human values such as belonging, trust, and emotional safety are becoming harder to develop and sustain in educational environments undergoing turmoil and change from a variety of influences. How might we preserve and nurture these values? How might we commit to practices that cultivate the wellness and well-being of our colleagues and communities? How might we commit to environments of authentic caring in which people feel emotionally safe and valued?

Over the past year, a small group of practitioners at several local institutions (BCcampus, Douglas College, Vancouver Community College) has been working on projects designed to encourage emotional care and wellness. In this interactive session on the theme of "Mental Health for all within and across our organizations", these practitioners will each share the hurdles and rewards of their process. The purpose of the session will be to provide participants with perspectives and tools to use in approaching themes of care and wellness at their own institutions -- with colleagues, students, and community partners.

The experiential session will be informed by the practice, theory, and research currently being conducted at the partner institutions involved in these projects. Participants will hear about common hurdles involved in promoting the care and wellness of people, will hear perspectives about navigating the complex terrain of human relationships, and will practice tools and ideas for moving forward with their own initiatives.

Speakers
avatar for Steven Bishop

Steven Bishop

Learning Designer, Douglas College
teaching and learning environments; experiential learning; curriculum design
avatar for Ross Laird

Ross Laird

Educational Consultant, Laird Associates
Ross Laird, Ph.D. is an author, consultant, educator, and scholar. His work focuses on the interconnected themes of mentorship, trauma, addictions, mental health, and creativity. Ross has worked with hundreds of organizations and thousands of individual clients and students, from... Read More →
avatar for Leva Lee

Leva Lee

Manager, BCcampus
In addition to the BCcampus Online Book Club (bccampusonlinebookclub.opened.ca) and ETUG History (etug.ca), feel free to ask me about stewarding communities of practice; the BCcampus Learning Access Program for Educators (LAP-E); the Scholarly Teaching and Ed Tech Fellows Programs... Read More →
avatar for Hope Miller

Hope Miller

Learning Designer, Douglas College
Hybrid and online teaching and learning, Blackboard, Edtech blogger, SCETUG member, Open Douglas
avatar for Sandra Polushin

Sandra Polushin

Coordinator / Faculty, Douglas College
Faculty



Monday May 28, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

10:30am AKDT

Diversity, Adversity, Perversity, and the University: Opportunities for Embedding and Celebrating Diversity in Class Materials
This will be a fun and engaging workshop to inspire participants to do a diversity audit on images, videos and other class materials that they use day-to-day in classrooms. An interactive learning exercise, and a short presentation will explore examples of how images and videos used in classroom presentations can promote diversity (racial, sexual, gender, ability) without necessarily being the subject of the course. Participants will have an opportunity to brainstorm ways they can use images, videos, literature excerpts, guest speakers and other resources in class to promote diversity, and to share their ideas with colleagues in the workshop. 

Speakers
avatar for David Geary

David Geary

Instructor, Capilano University
I teach scriptwriting in the IIDF Indigenous Independent Filmmaking program at Cap U, documentary, playwriting, and write haiku on twitter @gearsgeary. I'm from the New Zealand Maori iwi/tribe Taranaki and the settler nations of England, Scotland, and Ireland; and now also a Canadian... Read More →
avatar for Ki Wight

Ki Wight

Faculty, Capilano University
I am an instructor at Capilano University in the Schools of Motion Picture Arts and Communication Studies, and in Women's and Gender Studies, and a PhD student in the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser University. My areas of focus are anti-oppressive practices in education and... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 3

11:20am AKDT

Teaching and Learning with Technology
This session includes a brief demonstration of the various web projects and tool that I use in my Media and Humanities courses, as well as several student projects built over the last few years in my courses (about 25min). This will be followed by a question period and discussion of various web design tools (Wix, Weebly, Wordpress) as well as collaborative design tools (Canva) and video animation and editing tools (Pow Toons, etc.) (about 20min). The goal is to discuss the pros and cons of various web tools used for teaching and projects, and to collaborate together on a list of resource for our students to use for their web projects.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Kat Sark

Dr. Kat Sark

Adjunct Faculty, University of Victoria
I have been teaching and developing courses on media and technology within the Humanities for several years. My focus is on critical media literacy, social justice education, trans-cultural media analysis, cultural analysis and gender studies. In my presentation, I will demonstrate... Read More →



Monday May 28, 2018 11:20am - 12:05pm AKDT
Port of San Francisco

11:20am AKDT

We Need an Instructional Designer, STAT! The Critical and Underrated Role of Instructional Designers in Advancing Open Education
I need your help building a community of Instructional Design professionals and advocates to advance design work using Open Pedagogy. Come join me and your colleagues in sorting out the best way to start and get going!


The Open Education Community has been debating whether our focus should remain on access as an end game, or if it’s time for learning to take centre stage. Do we continue the narrative around cost-savings to students or do we now shift toward finding ways of building powerful learning experiences only possible with the 5 R’s of Open?

The reality is, we all want to create more engaging, flexible, impactful learning experiences for students. This is true if we are focussed on working towards equity of access to education, or on using Open Education to dig into learning design, development and delivery to achieve better results.

Instructional Designers have long been in the role of faculty support. They know learning theory and how to use it in practice. They understand the appropriate application of technology for learning. They can design to outcomes and support meaningful assessment. These are critical skills the Open Education movement needs. We have some very motivated, bright and innovative faculty and instructors doing amazing things with Open Pedagogy, but the vast majority of post-secondary educators do not have the skills and knowledge necessary for this level of independence.

In order to truly advance Open Education to its fullest potential, we need to invite and welcome Instructional Designers to our community. They are the people who sit next to instructors during course design and have the talk about switching to open resources. They make suggestions about activities that lead to student co-creation of knowledge. They cajole, convince and ultimately will support the next chapter of the open education movement. How do we meet them where they are? How do we support them?

In this session, participants will contribute to actively building support strategies and structures for use during the instructional design and course development processes to be used by Instructional Designers and others responsible for supporting instructors and faculty through learning design processes.

Speakers
avatar for Mary Burgess

Mary Burgess

Executive Director, BCcampus
Open Education, Teaching and Learning, Educational Technology, Leadership, organizational change...


Monday May 28, 2018 11:20am - 12:05pm AKDT
Port of New York

11:20am AKDT

Culture, Communication and Global Citizenship
Within HE there is an identified need to ensure that all students are equipped for success to meet the demands of an increasingly connected world. The Culture, Communication and Global Citizenship course was created specifically to draw on the expertise of faculty from across disciplines at North Island College and members of the local community, in order to give students the opportunity to explore issues around diversity and intercultural communication from multiple perspectives.

Starting out from the underlying premise of Global Citizenship Education as put forward by UNESCO, (http://en.unesco.org/gced), this course provides students with the opportunity to explore what it means to be both a human being and a global citizen within the context of complex intercultural interactions. Students are challenged to reconsider their views on what is considered to be legitimate knowledge, ways of being and effective intercultural communication. Through critical reflection on historical and current world events, as well as their own values and beliefs, students are encouraged to develop compassion, empathy and caring for others, and a greater appreciation for and understanding of diversity.
Given the emotive nature of the topics discussed and the importance of ensuring student wellbeing, an important consideration is to provide a space with the emotional safety essential for students to feel able to fully express themselves and explore complex ideas honestly and with compassion.

This presentation:
  • Describes how the course was organized to draw on interdisciplinary expertise;
  • Outlines activities used to foster emotional safety/wellbeing both in the classroom and in the online learning forum;
  • Explores the challenges encountered in supporting students in embracing the ‘unsettling’ but not ‘unsafe,’ in discussions of different ways of being in this world. 
  • Conference participants who attend this presentation will have the opportunity to experience examples of the activities used within this course and to contribute their knowledge and expertise in a discussion of the challenges of navigating the space between ‘unsettling’ – where learning takes place, and ‘unsafe’ - where learning stops.

Speakers
avatar for Terri Bateman

Terri Bateman

Distributed Learning Facilitator, North Island College
avatar for Margaret Hearnden

Margaret Hearnden

Global Learning Facilitator, North Island College
Margaret Hearnden is the Global Learning Facilitator at North Island College (NIC), developing and coordinating the educational elements of the internationalization process at NIC.


Monday May 28, 2018 11:20am - 12:05pm AKDT
Port of Singapore

11:20am AKDT

Transformative Music Education and Holistic Learning in the KPU Music Program
What does “care” look like in the 21st Century post-secondary music classroom? In the music department at Kwantlen Polytechnic University, faculty members are engaged in exploring how concepts merge with autonomy and agency within a number of the newly developed courses in the music curriculum. How are student’s creative ideas developed, produced and distributed, and how might these ideas travel through an educative trajectory of courses that are distinct yet complimentary?

Beginning in Jodi Proznick’s Jazz History course, we will demonstrate how students are engaged within interest-driven inquiry-based learning, developing music compositions that reflect their individual points of view and insights in relation to the course materials.  These projects are then carried forward into Dr. Gordon Cobb’s music technology course where ideas and compositions are developed into music recordings and collaborative music videos.  The educative trajectory continues in Don Hlus’ Business of Music course, where students develop websites containing artist statements, biographies, music playlists, video galleries and business plans that add depth, personality and branding to their developing profiles as emerging music artists.  This collaborative and holistic approach to music programming aims to make music education transformative by creating student-centred, interest-driven learning environments that are relevant, practical and engaging for 21st Century music learners.  

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Gordon Cobb

Dr. Gordon Cobb

Faculty, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
avatar for Don Hlus

Don Hlus

Director of Guitar, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Classical & Acoustic Finger-Style GuitaristDedicated Music EducatorDon Hlus has been on Faculty at Kwantlen Polytechnic University since 1993 and served as Chair of the Music Department from 2012-2018. He is also the Founder and Artistic Director of the Fraser Valley Acoustic Guitar... Read More →
avatar for Jodi Proznick

Jodi Proznick

Music Faculty, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Juno-nominated bassist, composer, bandleader, and educator Jodi Proznick has earned a reputation as one of Canada's finest jazz artists. She has won numerous National Jazz Awards, including Bassist of the Year in '08 and'09. Her group, the Jodi Proznick Quartet, was awarded the Acoustic... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 11:20am - 12:05pm AKDT
Port of Hong Kong

11:30am AKDT

12:05pm AKDT

BCcampus Scholarly Teaching Fellows
Speakers
avatar for Leva Lee

Leva Lee

Manager, BCcampus
In addition to the BCcampus Online Book Club (bccampusonlinebookclub.opened.ca) and ETUG History (etug.ca), feel free to ask me about stewarding communities of practice; the BCcampus Learning Access Program for Educators (LAP-E); the Scholarly Teaching and Ed Tech Fellows Programs... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 12:05pm - 1:00pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

12:05pm AKDT

Lunch
BUILD YOUR OWN ULTIMATE SOUP & SALAD BAR

Soup: Cream of Tomato & Basil Soup (GF, DF, V)

Salad: Chopped Romaine, Butter Lettuce, Mesclun, Arugula, Spinach, Tomato, Shredded Carrot, Peppers, Egg, Grated Cheddar Cheese, Grated Parmesan, Feta Radish, Croutons, Chickpeas, Kidney Beans, Raisins, Sunflower Seeds, Tofu, Lentils, Quinoa, Bean Sprouts Creamy Ranch, French Italian, Balsamic, Olive Oil

Seared Salmon Filet
 
Beverages:
  • Freshly Brewed Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee & Teas
  • Ice Tea & Lemonade

Dessert
: Vegan Cupcakes (V, VG, DF)


Monday May 28, 2018 12:05pm - 1:15pm AKDT
Ballroom 1

12:15pm AKDT

Mini Yoga Break (15 min)
  • Enjoy a 15 minute Mini Yoga Break (chair and standing Yoga). These are a great pick-me-up to help rejuvenate your mind and body.
  • Business attire is suitable for the class.
  • Relieves neck and shoulder tension, back pain and tight hips.
  • Transforms fatigue to alertness, stamina and greater productivity.
  • Boosts concentration to more effectively absorb the material being presented.

*All levels welcome!

Moderators
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Monday May 28, 2018 12:15pm - 12:30pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

12:30pm AKDT

12:45pm AKDT

Mini Yoga Break (15 min)
  • Enjoy a 15 minute Mini Yoga Break (chair and standing Yoga). These are a great pick-me-up to help rejuvenate your mind and body.
  • Business attire is suitable for the class.
  • Relieves neck and shoulder tension, back pain and tight hips.
  • Transforms fatigue to alertness, stamina and greater productivity.
  • Boosts concentration to more effectively absorb the material being presented.

*All levels welcome!

Moderators
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Monday May 28, 2018 12:45pm - 1:00pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

1:15pm AKDT

Kids Yoga
Time for a little stretch for our youngest conference attendees. Classes adapted to this age group and will be lead by the Festival's certified yoga instructor. 

Speakers
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga


Monday May 28, 2018 1:15pm - 1:45pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

1:15pm AKDT

Effectiveness of an Online Peer-feedback Tool
People attending this session will learn about the effectiveness of a BC made, free, online peer-feedback tool. The tool, ComPAIR, is grounded in the notion that comparing different answers fosters learners’ understanding of the features of a strong answer. During the session, attendees will: a) try out the online tool, b) learn the results of an experimental test of the tool, and c) use a ‘classroom response system’ to engage in a discussion of the challenges of rigourously evaluating learning innovations.

The teaching innovation explored here is grounded in two basic findings of pedagogic research. First, frequent formative assessments have the benefit of incentivizing active cognitive engagement with material. Encouraging student exploration of how and why their answers can be improved, however, is difficult. Second, peer feedback activities provide students with feedback and, more importantly, an opportunity to engage in critical reasoning about the characteristics of a good ‘answer’. Taken together, peer feedback provides an opportunity for students to deepen their learning by actively engaging with the content of their own answers and those of their peers.

In addition to providing an opportunity to use the tool, we will discuss results of an experimental test of online peer feedback in which 150 students in the same course were randomly assigned to either i) complete a peer-feedback exercise, or ii) a control group with no exercise. To test the tool we consider both: a) performance on subsequent assignments across the two experimental groups, and b) results from a student survey on their experiences using the tool. The session will conclude with a moderated discussion of the challenges and opportunities related to experimental analysis of educational innovations.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Owen

Andrew Owen

Instructor, University of British Columbia
I teach political science at UBC. My courses focus on quantitative research methods, public opinion, and political psychology. I joined UBC after earning my PhD in politics at Princeton. My teaching interests include: blended learning, technology in the classroom, and learning through... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm AKDT
Port of San Francisco

1:15pm AKDT

OER Adoption as a Community Project
The Facilitating Learning Online (FLO) – Fundamentals workshop has been implemented through BCcampus since 2013. During this time three new FLO workshops were developed, one of which is designed to prepare upcoming FLO facilitators, and each offering of FLO workshops provides an opportunity for these individuals to practice alongside experienced facilitators. In addition, all participants provide input into design and content revisions, a process that has been successfully managed because of the small scale of the project.

Ultimately, the goal of designing and hosting FLO workshops at BCcampus and preparing future facilitators is so others can successfully implement a high-quality experience for faculty and staff. All FLO workshops are openly licensed and available for institutions to implement in-house. Several B.C. institutions and non-profit organizations are actively exploring options for FLO adoption.

Typically support for the adoption of open educational resources (OER) centres around evaluation, and mechanics of using the resources – how to check for relevance and quality, how to integrate into a course environment, and so on. The focus is on the receiving end of the resources.

However, those involved in FLO facilitation and implementation, affectionately called FLO Enthusiasts, agree that there are specific elements that make FLO flow, so to speak. In other words, adoption goes beyond handing over the content. The success of these workshops requires an ongoing effort to advance the use of these OERs as a collaborative effort.

In this session we will explore the Facilitating Learning Online (FLO) family of workshops as a case for establishing a “handle with care” model for open educational resources (OER) adoption that both engages and serves a community of adopters. We will draw on experiences and expertise from session participants to sketch out a model that is functional and realistic.

Speakers
avatar for Sylvia Currie

Sylvia Currie

Learning and Teaching, BCcampus
I'm part of the professional learning team at BCcampus. Talk to me about facilitating learning online, social learning, learning communities, facilitating in the open, communities of practice, and dogs :)
avatar for Ross McKerlich

Ross McKerlich

Education Technology Coordinator, Okanagan College
Ross McKerlich is an education technology professional with many interests including emerging trends, avagogy (leading learners online) and quality of online learning. Ross enjoys skiing in the winter, stand up paddling in the summer and spending time with family all year round.



Monday May 28, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm AKDT
Port of Singapore

1:15pm AKDT

Rebus Community: What’s Next
The Rebus Community launched in November 2016 with the goal of building a new, collaborative model of open textbook publishing. To better understand what open textbook publishing entails, we provided hands-on support for 15 open textbook projects. In so doing, we learned what was involved in the process of making an open textbook. This feedback fed into the creation of software and resources to help make publishing easier for global textbook creators. As the next step, we’re launching this platform and sharing it with open textbook and OER creators. In this session, we’ll talk about where we’ve been, where we’re going, what we’ve learned, and how you can participate!

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Wake Hyde

Zoe Wake Hyde

Product Manager, Rebus Community


Monday May 28, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm AKDT
Port of New York

1:15pm AKDT

Developing Student's Strategic Learning
Developing Student's Strategic Learning Research studies indicate a positive relationship between a student’s metacognition and academic success. Metacognition can all be taught and through experience enhanced. Further this trait assisst students with being successful lifelong learners. This session focuses on metacognitive strategic learning strategies (student learning goals, planning, monitoring, reflecting to enhance learning effectiveness) faculty may embed in their learning environments.  Participants will then be able to evaluate multiple ways these strategies can be integrated into one’s teaching.

Note: The session will draw on all participant's experience and strategies in this area and will build on what participants are already doing.


Speakers
avatar for Peter Arthur

Peter Arthur

University of British Columbia Okanagan


Monday May 28, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 2

1:15pm AKDT

Student as Partners in Developing Curriculum and Teaching and Learning Initiatives
The shift from students as recipients of education to students as partners in the development and innovation of curriculum and pedagogy has brought about changes in how institutions prioritize student engagement. Engaging students through partnerships has the potential to transform teaching and learning in higher education not just for students but for the institution broadly (Healey, Flint, and Harrington, 2014). In 2017, Capilano University launched a Student Success Task Force with eight separate working groups to investigate recommendations for creating an outstanding student experience. Although student partnerships for institutional pedagogic consultancy and instructional development are less common (Healey, Flint, and Harrington, 2016) we intentionally structured our Curriculum, Teaching and Learning Working Group with a focus on student as partners with joint responsibility in the decision-making over the process and outcomes. In this session, we share the results and experiences of our students as partners initiative with a particular emphasis on the student voice. This Working Group was co-lead by two students and one faculty member. The student-faculty panel will describe the process of creating the student partnership, differences between the faculty and student perspectives, logistical challenges, and benefits to students, faculty, and institution.

Speakers
avatar for Laura MacKay

Laura MacKay

Director, Centre for Teaching Excellence, BCTLC Co-chair, Capilano University


Monday May 28, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

1:15pm AKDT

Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship: A Conversation
Spurred by the need to make education and research accessible to all, the open movement has gained ground as the Internet evolved to enable easy sharing of different forms of media and scholarship. Open practices are enabling faculty, staff and students at educational institutions in British Columbia and beyond to reduce barriers to research and education by opening their classrooms, incorporating new resources and perspectives, broadly sharing their data, and contributing to public knowledge. But the adoption of open scholarship cannot be assumed to free of biases and conflicts, and the impacts of open practices can differ depending on the context of those practices. Unaddressed tensions caused by “openness” can lead scholars, students, and community members to feel alienated, exploited, or unheard. Unexamined risks can lead to unintended outcomes for any open endeavours.

Within these intersections lies an opportunity for open scholarship: to directly examine and acknowledge the tensions and risks inherent in openness, and thereby create a space in which critical dialogue is generated and understanding of openness, including its possibilities and its risks, is deepened.

Please join a hands-on panel that will examines the threads running through different tensions in the open education, including:

*Indigenous & Traditional Knowledge: Open scholarship may not be respectful of community authority, ownership, and norms of knowledge sharing. Uncritical engagement with open in these contexts risks expropriating data and rearticulating settler colonialism in digital spaces.
*Ethics and Privacy: Open scholarship may complicate the impacts of human participants in research, retrospective digitization, and students’ right to privacy.
*Student-faculty relationships: Open pedagogies can create risks for students: are they supported and what rights do they have in terms of their privacy, copyright, and consent? Also, who benefits from open pedagogies? Are students able to use open projects created in class towards their own goals?
*Accessibility and inclusivity: Open practices may lead to digital redlining for individuals and communities and may not be truly accessible for everyone.
*Instructor-Institution relationships: Open practices may allow the appropriation of instructors’ and adjuncts’ work putting their value at risk.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Coolidge

Amanda Coolidge

Director, Open Education, Bccampus
Amanda Coolidge is the Director of Open Education at BCcampus. She leads the BC Open Textbook Project as well as the Open Education initiatives in the province of British Columbia, Canada. The BCcampus Open Education team produces Open Educational Resources (OER) – textbooks, toolkits... Read More →
LC

Leonora Crema

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of British Columbia
avatar for Sue Doner

Sue Doner

Faculty, Instructional Designer, Camosun College
Instructional Designer: especially interested in Universal Design for Learning; Accessibility in online learning
avatar for Erin Fields

Erin Fields

Open Education and Scholarly Communications Librar, UBC
UBC
avatar for David Gaertner

David Gaertner

Instructor, UBC
David specializes in new media and digital storytelling, emphasizing the ways in which Indigenous artists, storytellers, and programmers engage the land and community with technology. As a teacher, David aims to empower Indigenous and non-Indigenous students with the skills and confidence... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 1:15pm - 2:45pm AKDT
Ballroom 3

1:15pm AKDT

Take the Stress out of Teamwork: Practical Tools and Coaching for the Effective Implementation of Teamwork in Post-secondary Education
Team-based work is often implemented with the assumption that students will instinctively develop teamwork skills through these experiences. Unfortunately, simply participating in team projects does not necessarily allow students to develop appropriate teamwork capabilities. In reality, students are often unaware of which specific behaviors lead to effective teamwork. Teamwork that is not properly supported may leave students feeling personally stressed and ill-equipped for work in today’s dynamic work environments. Additionally, instructors wanting to capitalize on the benefits of team-based learning often require additional guidance and tools that are needed to successfully facilitate functional teamwork in their classrooms. This interactive and experiential session will explore key strategies for developing and maintaining healthy student teams.

Presentation: 
Breif introduction to who we are and highlights from our program of research. 

SUIT - Teamwork Communication: 
This guided experiential activity explores the SUIT framework and its application in the classroom. Attendees will learn about the different types of conflict that teams can experience, and practice a structured communication framework that can be implemented in your student teams.

Tips and Tricks: 
Team Coaches from Royal Roads University will provide favorite coaching tips throughout the session, which address common challenges reported by student teams.

Wrap up: 
Closing thoughts and provide attendees access to our bundle of tools, slide decks, and debriefs. 

Speakers
avatar for Trish Dyck

Trish Dyck

Manager of Team Coaching, Team Coach, Royal Roads University
Manager of Team Coaching at Royal Roads University (RRU). Team Coaching is a co-curricular support service at RRU offering team skill development, co-creation with instructors around team design/assessment, live team coaching, and mediation. I invite conversations on Team Based Learning... Read More →
avatar for Nicole Larson

Nicole Larson

Project Lead, ITP Metrics, ITP Lab
I’m in my 3rd year of my PhD in Industrial Organizational Psychology at the University of Calgary. I have been working with the Individual and Team Performance Lab (ITP) for the past six years, and have conducted research on team dynamics, conflict, decision-making, peer feedback... Read More →
DT

Dr. Tom O'Neill

Associate Professor, Director of ITP Lab, University of Calgary
avatar for Nooreen Shah-Preusser

Nooreen Shah-Preusser

Team Coach, Royal Roads University
As a Team Coach at Royal Roads University, it is my privilege to work with learners to develop and hone their skills to achieve a high performing team. I delight in using experiential activities as well as harnessing people's own lived experiences and knowledge to create a collective... Read More →



Monday May 28, 2018 1:15pm - 2:45pm AKDT
Port of Hong Kong

1:50pm AKDT

Quiet Reflection & Meditation Drop-in
This is an open time/space for quiet reflection and/or meditation.

Festival attendees are invited to drop in for any length of time. 

We encourage people to "check their devices" at the door, but portable devices with headphones to support your meditation or other quiet reflective practices are permitted. 

Monday May 28, 2018 1:50pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

2:05pm AKDT

Flipping the Classroom: Why all Students Must be Active Learners
With our world so rapidly advancing and changing around us, we need to consider the different ways educational institutions convey new information to their students. According to Jason L. Frand, the role of professors and educators of all kinds is evolving. Compared to a decade ago, the role of educators has shifted from leading group activities based on memorization and repetition to a more individualized, guided learning experience (Frand, 2000). Educators are the architects of their student’s minds, building knowledge and ability as they guide them through new learning theories, thoughts and values.
Yet, with our population rapidly expanding, and technology becoming increasingly pervasive, we must assist students to overcome the many distractions that come alongside a bigger lecture or classroom. According to a study published in 2013, the average university student attention span can be anywhere from 10 to 18 minutes, and this is only during the first hour (Briggs, 2014).
Clearly, educators must do everything in their power to hold the attention and engagement of their students. By implementing active learning strategies, flipping the classroom and utilizing gamification, students are more engaged and motivated during lectures, while having the added benefit of being able to review their knowledge and understanding of key concepts and theories amongst each other.
By flipping the classroom and allowing students to collaborate and learn from each other, we open the doors to better-facilitated classroom discussions and increased participation while emphasizing the educator's role as a guide - no longer the sole deliverer of content.

Speakers
avatar for Geoffrey Ashford-Smith

Geoffrey Ashford-Smith

Account Manager, Turning Technologies Canada
My job is to educate educators. Speaking with different professors across Canada every day gives me unique insight into what is going on in today's classrooms, I get to see what is working and what isn't. I'm looking forward to sharing my findings and expanding on how an flipped classrooms... Read More →
avatar for Peter Ferreira

Peter Ferreira

Turning Technologies
Turning Technologies Canada - Simple. Reliable. Seamless Solutions include TurningPoint response technology that creates interactive presentations. Medical learning environments have experienced tremendous benefit from the integration of response technology for training sessions... Read More →
avatar for Matej Perisa

Matej Perisa

Corporate Trainer, Turning Technologies Canada
Our purpose-driven learning and engagement solutions are proven to enhance classroom learning, meetings and events. Easy to use response technology systems create collaborative environments, interactive presentations, deliver assessments and collect real-time feedback to provide insight... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Port of Singapore

2:05pm AKDT

Student-Experience Design and Learner-Driven Open Educational Practices: eCampusOntario’s SXD Lab
Why do we care about education? Why is education a priority for the public? Who is education for? The eCampusOntario Student-Experience Design (SXD) Lab explores these fundamental questions by empowering students to take charge of the learning design process. In Fall 2017, eCampusOntario launched the SXD Lab in partnership with leading designers, industry partners, educators and Ontario higher education students. The SXD Lab creates an environment in which teams of students use design thinking methodology to prototype openly-licensed outputs that have an impact on students’ learning experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Fernlund

Chris Fernlund

Lead, Student Supports, eCampusOntario
I'm Chris and I am a Canadian with a passion for accessible and affordable high-quality education. I have been involved with education for a number of years in different capacities such as institutions, student government, non-profits and most recently, a government agency called... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Port of San Francisco

2:05pm AKDT

Handle with Care: How OER Policy Development can Influence Institutional Practices
Care can take many forms. Post-secondary institutions are looking to provide care and support to students and staff around issues such as inclusivity, accessibility, and social justice through the thoughtful selection of Open Education Resources (OERs). But often there is confusion around how OERs can be located, evaluated, and used ethically by instructors and curriculum personnel (Belikov & Bodily, 2016; Jhangiani, et.al., 2016). This was seen at our institution, where a lack of OER policy and procedures caused the implementation by instructors and curriculum personnel to be lukewarm.

At the same time, our institution is looking to be a good steward of the budget by using OERs to address the financial pressure associated with curriculum development. These two visions, which sometimes appear to be competing with each other, can be addressed in clear institutional OER policy and procedures.

Our intention in this presentation is to share the creation of Southern Alberta Institution of Technology’s (SAIT) first OER Policy and Procedure. We’ll bring participants along on the journey which involved a determination of our readiness (Simmons, 2017), a review of existing Canadian and American institutional OER policies, our feedback process from diverse stakeholders, as well as the development of an institutional communication plan, and then share the final policy.

We will also discuss how the creation of policy and procedure may influence and broaden institutional viewpoints around inclusivity and social justice.

Included will be a brief semi-structured discussion with the presentation participants around roadblocks, concerns, and current practices at their institutions. Small groups will be encouraged to brainstorm strategies to create policy-based best practices at their institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Horgan

Christine Horgan

Curriculum Coordinator, Southern Alberta of Technology
Christine (Chris) Horgan is a Curriculum Coordinator in a large service school at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology. She's been involved in an OER pilot project (through ABOER) and is co-leading a project to Canadianize a BCCampus OER e-book for use in 12 communications... Read More →



Monday May 28, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Port of New York

2:05pm AKDT

...Reconciliation as a Hybrid Pedagogy: Reflections on Decolonial Access, Accessibility, Affective Process and Action in Reconciliation Education
Following the Truth and Reconciliation (TRC) Calls to Action, educators across the country have actively engaged in the development of reconciliation education. In the context higher education this has taken the form of curricular development and programming that specifically address social conscience and responsibility of the Canadian public. By creative engagement of non-indigenous and Indigenous students in learning about histories of Indigenous peoples’ experiences of resurgence and decolonial resistance, university students are increasingly engaged in issues of equity and inclusion within systems of education, as well as primed for more robust engagement in the public sphere. Convergent with work of the TRC, digital ecologies have proliferated and mainstreamed, mobilizing substantial shifts and developments in hybrid pedagogy. While hybrid pedagogy as a movement resists classification, proponents primarily converge in the intersections of critical methodologies for education and exploring the political implications of new media and technology. In the context of this presentation, the presenter will provide an overview of how this work has been taken up in the field of child and youth care at the University of Victoria, with particular attention to curricular development which exposes students to the settler-colonial structures which have impacted (and continue to impact) Indigenous children, youth and families (i.e., IRS, the 60s Scoop, foster care, and mass incarceration), as well as the forms of decolonial resistance which are mobilized through digital ecologies (i.e., legal, political structures, activism online). Special attention will be given to how these initiatives have helped reconfigure reconciliation education as a hybrid pedagogy in the following ways: (1) by addressing issues of access through a blended learning format, (2) by diversifying the issue of accessibility in terms of clarifying unique needs of Indigenous and non-Indigenous learners, (3) by illuminating the affective processes that result from reconciliation education, including mental health paradigms such as trauma-informed praxis and life promotion paradigms, as well as fragility and ally-ship, and (4) the ways in which digital ecologies materialize decolonial actions through innovative media and methods that are networked and participant-driven. Examples from piloted project will be presented and implications for pedagogy and research will be explored.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Ansloos

Jeffrey Ansloos

Assistant Professor, University of Toronto-OISE
@JeffreyAnsloos is Assistant Professor of Indigenous Mental Health and Social Policy at OISE-University of Toronto, as well as an adjunct faculty member with the School of Child and Youth Care at the University of Victoria. He is Nehiyaw (Cree) and English, and is a member of Fisher... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Ballroom 2

2:05pm AKDT

Taking Care as we Live our Model: the RRU Learning, Teaching and Research Model
In this session we will examine the way in which the learning, teaching and research model (LTRM) enables Royal Roads University (RRU) to foster a climate of care, enact its vision and values, and model a way of seeing and being in the physical and virtual environments that are its context.

Grounded in the RRU purpose of “transformation for positive social change”, the learning and teaching model at RRU has been the subject of an ongoing action research project incorporating design thinking in order to meet the faculty and staff call for revision and renewal of the model and the changing landscape of post-secondary education.

The LTRM is RRU‘s signature pedagogy, which Shulman (2005) defined as the distinctive teaching and learning practices characteristic to the education of future practitioners in a given field. Signature pedagogies do more than teach knowledge and skills to future practitioners; they also foster a particular way of seeing the world, that includes “professional attitudes, values and dispositions” distinct to the profession (p. 55). In so doing, they also shape future practice, and set the direction for the future of the profession.

Central to the RRU LTRM is the concept of care, with empathy, relationships, and systems thinking underpinning the why, what and the how of the model. In this interactive discussion we will share the ways in which the LTRM is currently informing the processes and practices of care at RRU, and the areas in which there is room to grow. We will examine how care is being taken up in the ways in which the model is being enacted and discuss how the attributes of the model are applied to learning, teaching and research across RRU to foster caregiving/taking in all of our stakeholders.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Childs

Elizabeth Childs

Professor & Program Head, Royal Roads University (RRU)
At RRU we are designing a Masters program with openness, networked learning and digital mindset as core design principles.
avatar for Dr. Jennifer Walinga

Dr. Jennifer Walinga

Professor and Director, Royal Roads University
Dr. Jennifer Walinga is Director of the School of Communication and Culture at Royal Roads University. An experienced educator and former member of Canada’s Commonwealth, World and Olympic gold medal rowing teams (1983 to 1992), she draws on her personal experiences to frame the... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

2:50pm AKDT

Break
Snack: Selection of Whole Fresh Fruit, Bananas, Apples & Pears

Beverages: Freshly Brewed Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee & Teas

Monday May 28, 2018 2:50pm - 3:15pm AKDT
2nd Floor Foyer

3:15pm AKDT

Team Chat: A Technology for Learning
I will present about UBC’s efforts to implement and evaluate team chat as a learning technology for online and blended courses. Team chat (like Slack) is a transformative communication and collaboration technology, combining threaded discussions with real-time chat in an intuitive and flexible way. Features like persistent history, advanced search capability, file sharing, typing status, mobile apps, and emoji reactions add up to a versatile tool that is still easy to use.

Research shows how timely interactions with instructors, collaboration with classmates, and a sense of community can enhance teaching and learning. This is particularly important in an online learning environment. Team chat has given our students a direct communication channel to their instructor and each other, helping them connect, ask questions, seek clarification, collaborate, and build community.

Since 2016, the Faculty of Education has been piloting an open source team chat application called Mattermost on a UBC-hosted server. Unlike Slack or Microsoft Teams, which are both cloud-hosted outside of Canada, Mattermost allows us to keep student data secure in compliance with BC’s Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA). Mattermost has been used in over 20 course sections across the faculties of Education, Arts, and Science. As of December 2017, the UBC Mattermost pilot consists of 100 daily active users, 300 monthly active users, and almost 70,000 posts.

Attendees will learn (and chat) about:

• Ways team chat can enhance learning 
• How team chat has been applied in real use cases including online program cohorts, learning communities, and research teams
• The relationship between secure, safe, transparent platforms and academic freedom 

Mattermost will be blended into the session, allowing attendees to choose the conversation(s) they wish to join, participate in real-time, network with colleagues, and carry on chatting after the Festival of Learning concludes.

Speakers
avatar for Ian Linkletter

Ian Linkletter

Learning Technology Specialist, University of British Columbia
Ian is the Faculty of Education's Learning Technology Specialist. He helps instructors integrate technology with their teaching in effective, evidence-based, and innovative ways. Ian specializes in distance education and is the Project Manager of the Reconciliation Through Indigenous... Read More →



Monday May 28, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of San Francisco

3:15pm AKDT

OE Advocacy and Action at the University of Alberta: The Progress, Collaboration and Challenges for OE Initiatives at a Large, Multi-Campus Institution
This presentation investigates the challenges in Open Education (OE) advocacy at the University of Alberta (U of A) where institutional support and interest is still emergent. OE initiatives and advocacy at the U of A has recently been pushed to a new level of priority with the hiring of an Open Education Project Manager in the Centre for Teaching and Learning and an OE-focused Digital Initiatives Librarian at the U of A Libraries. These new position have given OE a foothold by fostering a collaboration between the CTL and Libraries by dedicating staff to OE on the U of A Campus.

Aside from these new position, a campus wide interest group, a multi-unit advocacy group, a new OER Awards program, and a select number of sustained champions including, U of A librarian's, the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, and the Campus Bookstore have been dedicating time to the progress of OE on our campus. OE work to date at U of A has produced several successes including the OER awards program that aims to support faculty in the use of OER in course delivery, growing student interest in OE advocacy through a Be Booksmart and Textbook Broke campaign, administrative support from the Office of the Vice-Provost Learning Initiatives, and the internationally recognized Surgery 101 podcast project.

Despite these achievements, progress toward broader engagement with OE including use of OER and open pedagogy has been strained by several factors, a struggle identified by Gerald Beasley (2017) as a “Sisyphean challenge.” Provincially, the cancellation of the ABOER program resulting in less formalized means for coordination of OE efforts among Alberta institutions, and a stagnant provincial repository. While localized to our campus, there has been limited update in OER events, particularly among faculty, and engaged champions represent only a few groups from a multi-location campus. Engaged champions represent several campus constituencies and must balance needs and priorities of those with and without academic freedom and a mix of seniority levels. Most importantly, the vast majority of advocacy work being undertaken by the same core group of roughly a dozen at an institution with over 40,000 students, staff and faculty.

Speakers
MB

Michelle Brailey

Librarian, University of Alberta Library
Michelle supports institution-wide program development, awareness, and sustainability of OER. As an open education advocate, she contributes to the open education movement locally and globally through initiatives advocating for open educational resources, open data, and open acce... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of Singapore

3:15pm AKDT

OEP in Remote Australian Aboriginal Workforce Development: What translates?
There is ongoing and increasing interest in learner-created OER and participatory teaching and learning dialogue as part of open educational practice (OEP) and pedagogy. In preparation for economic and workforce participation, remotely placed Aboriginal learners face a complex set of factors to negotiate. Increasing levels of consensual, collaborative, and situated practices in an effort to open up the learning dialogue and community of practice aims to respect learners’ knowledge authority.

4 applied action research projects attempt to embody a number of these forms of OEP. This workshop aims to answer the questions;
• What principles of openness do they practice?
• Can these practices be adapted for localized content?
• How else can the resources be open?

The case studies (media links available https://au.linkedin.com/in/johanna-funk-09937144 ):

*Bowerbird- Djurrwirr: a citizen science social media platform populated with Traditional Ecological Knowledge and photos as a pilot tool for use in remote biosecurity surveillance in Aboriginal communities.

*PreVET: a set of openly available job pathway resources intended for early workforce development, embedding literacy and numeracy into work settings, as showcased by Aboriginal role models in their workplaces.

*Indigenous Fisheries Training Framework and Videos: Learner-created OER and associated training framework adapted to be locally relevant to research partners' requests. This framework aims to streamline mainstream enterprise compliance and complement learning for traditionally embedded aquaculture practices.

*Indigenous Engagement Model for building resilience in Indigenous Communities: A focus on Biosecurity Threats: a model aiming to engage biosecurity officials and traditional owners in functional relationships as research partners in management of incursions onto countryside and food-growing regions.

I will:
  • Introduce resources and context 
  • Discuss with participants how 'open' they are as practices; could they see themselves using these approaches, how could it be translated to their settings?
  • Explore and record participant feedback about which openness principles are practiced (or not) from generative themes identified and perspectives such as cultural responsibility, context immersion, acknowledgement of learner background, variations of openness, and deeper learning potential 

Speakers

Monday May 28, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 3

3:15pm AKDT

Connecting Students with People who Care(er): Post-Secondary Professionals as ‘Everyday Career Influencers’
Increasingly students begin their post-secondary experience with a career in mind, and two recent studies (Environics Research Group, 2011; Ho, 2017) suggest that those paths are largely influenced by educators (e.g. Faculty) before a student even considers visiting a career centre. Consequently, these professionals have the inherent capacity to extend their care for students beyond their teaching roles: as Career Influencers, defined by the EdD study as individuals working in a higher education institution who informally provide career-related advice, guidance, and/or counselling to prospective and current students and/or alumni.

This session has two goals. It aims to help attendees recognize their influence in student career development, and consider how they can incorporate career development components into their teaching practice. Findings and implications from Ho’s (2017) EdD study will serve as a backdrop of the session (research questions are included at the end*), while attendees are guided through reflective and discussion activities that enhance the awareness of their influence in student career development.

Current planned activities include having the attendees:
-Reflect on their “constellation of life roles” (Magnusson, 2014) and how roles, events, and experiences contribute to their approach as educators

-Consider how their current activities and interactions with students (e.g., curriculum, office hours conversations) help students develop employability skills

-Discuss their impressions on the notion of the ‘Everyday Career Influencer’, pondering on questions such as:
  • How do they currently serve as Career Influencers and demonstrate a sense of care for student career development? 
  • How might they further their practice as Career Influencers?
  • What opportunities and/or challenges do they face as Career Influencers within their institutions? What can they do to take advantage and/or overcome them?

-EdD study research questions and sub-questions:
How do post-secondary education professionals conceive their influence in student career development?
  • How do they conceptualize the term “career”?
  • How do they see their role as having an impact on student career development?
  • How do they see themselves as individuals as having an impact on student career development?
  • What resources and/or competencies do they believe are important in furthering their impact on student career development?

Speakers
avatar for Candy Ho

Candy Ho

Faculty, Educational Studies, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Candy Ho teaches at Kwantlen Polytechnic University’s Educational Studies department in the Faculty of Arts. She is keen to explore the convergence between career education and development, teaching and learning, and student success.
avatar for Dr. Cindy Xin

Dr. Cindy Xin

Director of Research, Simon Fraser University
SFU



Monday May 28, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of Hong Kong

3:15pm AKDT

Supporting Student Wellness Through Intentional Knowledge Practice Teaching
Based on recent data collected at this university, it is apparent that students are leaving our institution not able to articulate what they have learned. In addition, the data collected illuminated a gap in faculty explicitly assisting students to connect classroom learning to the knowledge and skills that employers are demanding. This research is supported by the recent work of Harrison (2017), Markauskaite and Goodyear (2016), and a Brock University study of psychology majors (Martini, Judges & Belicki, in press).

The inability to connect learning toward work/life readiness after university is causing students major stress (Maybrey, 2017). Beebe, Mottet & Roach, 2013 suggest “The focus of affective learning is on changing learners’ attitudes, feelings, and motivation level, and enhances the value and appreciation for learning. In an affective learning environment, teaching becomes more than conveying content or developing skills; it involves helping learners understand how to value and respect what they learn” (Beebe, Mottet & Roach, 2013). When, learners can connect their learning to their goals their stress levels and wellness improve.

As educators concerned for our students’ well being, what should we be doing to help them recognize their own learning and transfer it to other situations?

This session brings together the work of an interdisciplinary team (i.e., Social Work, Nursing, Teacher Education, Communications, and Teaching and Learning), engaged in knowledge-practice educational design, teaching, and research to present and facilitate an interactive discussion around instructional innovation in emerging knowledge-practice work and its application to student wellness, engagement and success.

The aim of this session is to present preliminary research followed by an interactive discussion among participants to continue this timely and relevant dialogue. The outcomes for the session are to:

  1. Define knowledge-practice teaching across disciplines, educational roles, and with the context of student wellness
  2. Discuss emerging practices in addressing the challenges facing faculty when using a pedagogy of care approach to knowledge-practice learning.
  3. Exchange teaching and learning strategies used to foster knowledge-practice learning
  4. Foster multidisciplinary collaboration opportunities across faculties, educational roles, and learning communities.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Pardy

Linda Pardy

Associate Professor, University of the Fraser Valley
Knowledge Practice and Experiential Learning Innovations in Teaching. Expanding Career Options for Arts Majors. Indigenization: Faculty development for non-Indigenous instructors. Teaching and Learning: Faculty Involvement in Student Development Storytelling: Alternative Notions for... Read More →
avatar for Maureen Wideman

Maureen Wideman

Associate Vice President, Teaching and Learning, University of the Fraser Valley
Maureen has spent more than 25 years in the teaching and learning field beginning as an instructional designer, faculty member, director and now AVP. She approaches faculty development as a student success initiative and maintains the learner-centred approach in all she does. Her... Read More →


Monday May 28, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

3:15pm AKDT

The Enneagram's 9 Personality Types at Work: Developing Self-Compassion, Self-Care and Mindful Connection
Part of cultivating positive mental health and self-care at work and in learning environments is becoming more aware of who we are in our unique personalities. The Enneagram is an ancient tool for describing 9 Personality Types with their integration (leading towards health) as well as disintegration (unhealthy tendencies). Noticing these patterns will bring awareness to how we can practice self-compassion and healthy interconnectivity with other personalities and celebrate our different strengths. This session will explore the process of typing ourselves based on the Ennegram, and outline the interconnectivity of all the personality types. The focus will be on workplace mental health and healthy interconnection with colleagues. 

Speakers
avatar for Barish Golland

Barish Golland

Operations Manager, Learning Technology Ecosystems, UBC Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia
I get excited about finding ways to improve learning with technology that doesn't get in the way. I love using Liberating Structures to engage everyone in finding productive ways forward, enabling connection and idea flow. On the side I'm passionate about STEM in K-12 and volunteer... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Slovencik

Jennifer Slovencik

I am passionate about helping empower people to know themselves deeply while practicing compassion for self and others using tools such as the enneagram and non-violent communication (Dr. Marshall B. Rosenberg) and building communities that reflect these values.


Monday May 28, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of New York

3:15pm AKDT

UDL Conversation Starters
The Universal Design for Learning conversation kits are user-centred toolkits to promote dialogue about increasing accessibility in learning environments. In these toolkit’s, we’ve assembled flexible options for conversation starters and curated resources to support and enhance those conversations. From a 10 minute dialogue to a full learning session, facilitators can use the kits without a deep prior knowledge of UDL. The idea is that we are all learning together. These kits work for multiple audiences, from instructional faculty to administrators to student service providers. In this session, we’ll provide an overview of the conversion kits and you’ll practice using them to lead a conversation about one of the topics. You’ll also be asked to provide feedback on ways to improve the kits.

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Fraser

Ruth Fraser

Director Accessibility Services, KPU


Monday May 28, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 2

4:15pm AKDT

Childcare Closes
Monday May 28, 2018 4:15pm - 4:30pm AKDT
- Room 440 (4th Floor)

4:30pm AKDT

Festival Social (dinner, trivia, prizes, + special performance by The 3Ds!)
Join us in the Vista Room on the 19th floor of our conference hotel. Enjoy 360-degree views of the city and North Shore mountains, a no-host bar, entertainment and time to connect with friends and colleagues.

Hungry? A dinner package will be available with casual fare including a meat and veggie burger options, organic greens, and a choice of a drink from a selection of beer, wine, or non-alcoholic beverages for $35.

The evening's entertainment will start with TRIVIA and PRIZES...there will be questions about Teaching & Learning, Educational Technology and Open Education, so bring your thinking caps for chances to win cool prizes.

And then, we move on to...a very special event with the 3Ds!

Doodle. Dance. Disco.

The 3Ds, a nouveau trio of educators, combine forces to occupy the Festival of Learning social space. Employing visual practice, physical movement and sonic resonance, the 3Ds are featured in this celebratory occasion to highlight the conference theme, “what does care looks like in learning and teaching today”, by reflecting participants’ reaction to our prompt…

“What moves you?”

In this highly interactive, sensory rich session, the presenters fuse their talents to engage participants and redefine the learning experience like never before. On the dancefloor.

Boom! Boom! Boom! #whatmovesyou #fol18 #boom




Monday May 28, 2018 4:30pm - 9:00pm AKDT
Vistas - 19th Floor
 
Tuesday, May 29
 

7:00am AKDT

Registration Open
Tuesday May 29, 2018 7:00am - 7:30am AKDT
2nd Floor Foyer

7:30am AKDT

Gentle Flow Yoga (30 mins)
This class takes a gentler approach to the traditional Power Flow style, focusing on healing the body and mind through a connection with the breath and mindful movements to reduce tension and increase energy.  This is a practice of gentle flowing postures that will warm and open the body, encourage internal health and quiet the mind.  Suited for beginners and experienced  students.

*All levels welcome!
*Yoga mats provided or feel free to bring your own
*Wear your yoga gear or something comfortable to stretch in

Moderators
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Tuesday May 29, 2018 7:30am - 8:00am AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

7:30am AKDT

Breakfast
BREAKFAST BUFFET 
Assorted Cold Cereal, Muesli, Shreddies, Raisin Bran, Cheerios
Breakfast Potatoes with Peppers & Sauteed Onions
Chef's Vegetarian Omelette
Pork Sausage, Turkey Sausage

Beverages: 
Chilled Fresh Orange, Apple & Grapefruit Juice
Freshly Brewed Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee & Teas

Tuesday May 29, 2018 7:30am - 9:00am AKDT
Ballroom 1

8:00am AKDT

8:15am AKDT

Mini Yoga Break (15 min.)
  • Enjoy a 15 minute Mini Yoga Break (chair and standing Yoga). These are a great pick-me-up to help rejuvenate your mind and body.
  • Business attire is suitable for the class.
  • Relieves neck and shoulder tension, back pain and tight hips.
  • Transforms fatigue to alertness, stamina and greater productivity.
  • Boosts concentration to more effectively absorb the material being presented.

*All levels welcome!

Moderators
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Tuesday May 29, 2018 8:15am - 8:30am AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

8:30am AKDT

Childcare Opens
Tuesday May 29, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am AKDT
- Room 440 (4th Floor)

8:45am AKDT

Quiet Reflection & Meditation Drop-in
This is an open time/space for quiet reflection and/or meditation.

Festival attendees are invited to drop in for any length of time. 

We encourage people to "check their devices" at the door, but portable devices with headphones to support your meditation or other quiet reflective practices are permitted. 

Tuesday May 29, 2018 8:45am - 12:00pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

9:00am AKDT

Keynote Panel with Students & Academic Leaders, moderated by Jonny Morris: What is the next level of thinking and planning we need to do to help students thrive in post-secondary education?
What is the next level of thinking and planning we need to do to help students thrive in post-secondary education? 

Join us for a rich, multi-layered discussion with students and academic leaders about a range of factors influencing student health, wellness and care in post-secondary education.

Facilitated by Jonny Morris, former Senior Director at the Canadian Mental Health Association and leader in the Healthy Minds/Healthy Campuses community, this keynote panel will explore the impact of things like pedagogy, learning design, learning environments, technology, rising costs, and institutional supports on students’ health and wellbeing.

This special keynote session will begin with student voices: we will hear about their own experiences in BC post-secondary institutions. Next, we will invite responses from academic leaders, those in charge of policy and other major decisions that shape the student experience.

Then, the audience will be invited to contribute questions and comments to the conversation. And finally, a summary and closing remarks by Jonny Morris to wrap up this unique discussion.

Student Panel:
  • Lukash Zalubniak - University of Victoria
  • Kennedy Aragon-Scriven - University of British Columbia
  • Kiana Alexander - Raven Institute
Response Panel:
  • Kathryn McNaughton, Vice President Academic, Students & Research at Vancouver Community College
  • Justin Kohlman, Vice President Education, Students and International at Northwest Community College
  • Jesse Stommel, faculty member, educator, critical edtech, documentary film
  • Tannis Morgan - Director of the Centre for Teaching, Learning, & Innovation at Justice Institute

Speakers
avatar for Jonny Morris

Jonny Morris

In his past role at the Canadian Mental Health Association, Jonny provided leadership for provincial mental health and substance use advocacy and change initiatives through the Association’s provincial office and the branch network across British Columbia. His work focused on addressing... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 9:00am - 10:15am AKDT
Ballroom 1

10:00am AKDT

Private Meeting: Lauri Aesoph
Speakers
avatar for Lauri Aesoph

Lauri Aesoph

Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
Lauri supports the development and sharing of open educational resources in British Columbia. She has project managed and led workshops and webinars on the adoption, adaptation, and creation of open educational resources. She also provides technical and instructional design support... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 10:00am - 12:00pm AKDT
Port of Shanghai (Boardroom)

10:15am AKDT

Break
Snack:  Fresh Cut Seasonal Fruits, Melons & Berries

Beverages: Freshly Brewed Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee & Teas

Tuesday May 29, 2018 10:15am - 10:30am AKDT
2nd Floor Foyer

10:30am AKDT

Badge Earned: Lessons from Gamifying First Year Computer Science
Increased student engagement has been linked to increased self-belief (Zepke and Leach, 2010), improved academic performance as well as improved mental health and psychological adjustment with respect to learning (Wang and Peck, 2013).

Gamification is one method being used to engage students with low intrinsic motivation. Current research in gamification of learning focuses on students at the primary and high school levels, and there remains relatively little discussion in terms of implementing and scaling these techniques at the postsecondary level. In gamification, elements associated with video games are applied in non-game contexts such as education. Simple techniques such as badges or achievements can be effective positive behaviour modifiers, yet their effects are often short-lived due to diminishing novelty (Looyestyn et al., 2017), and their impact on student academic performance appears mixed (Papastergiou 2009; Perry 2015). Despite these potential shortcomings, in the summer of 2016 a custom, open source, web-based badge platform was developed to help address declining student participation and academic performance by engaging them with game-like rewards (Johnson 2016).

This platform and the in-class trials have renewed discussion and interest at Laurentian University (and beyond) in gamification as a tool to help engage postsecondary learners in order to improve academic success at the individual level and student retention at the course and institution levels.

In this presentation I'll: 
  • use the lessons learned over the past two academic years to help frame both the role and student-centric value of simple gamification techniques such as badges, leaderboards and instant feedback. 
  • discuss upcoming extensions to the current badging system, including automated awarding, integrated quizing, and how I hope to improve both the academic and personal experiences for students and simplify management instructors. 
  • address the advantages and disadvantages of our badge system when compared to increasingly popular “open” badging platforms. 
  • finish by making a case for deeper and more complex gamification elements such as quest-based learning (Haskell 2013) and discuss how such elements, which are relatively successful in primary and high schools, might be modified to better suit postsecondary learners.


Speakers
avatar for Aaron Langille

Aaron Langille

Master Lecturer, Laurentian University
Professor of computer science and video game design. Interested in student engagement, retention and recruitment as well as gamification, open education and more.



Tuesday May 29, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am AKDT
Port of Vancouver

10:30am AKDT

Consulting with Care: Supporting Faculty Development and Program Enhancement through Collaborative, Relational Practice
Educational developers are often agents of change, supporting faculty development and program enhancement in a variety of ways, across a variety of programs (Beach, A., Henderson C., Finkelstein, N., 2012). Supporting and facilitating change in this context can be challenging and requires the development and demonstration of a variety of skills that go beyond curriculum expertise and engagement in the classroom. Supporting change, especially in large-scale initiatives, often requires educational developers use a variety of skills including tactful communication and a keen ability to listen. Furthermore, these changes need to demonstrate a degree a relational care, including empathy as well as an ability to build trust and relationships. These skills are important in all educational development contexts, but most necessary when barriers and resistance to change are present.

In this presentation, three educational developers share their stories of how they planned, supported and facilitated change in a large-scale program enhancement program within the Faculty of Trades and Applied Technology at their institution. They will each discuss their positionality in the project, each coming from a slightly different context (mid-career educational developer; seconded faculty member; emerging educational development consultant). The team’s diversity ensured that a broader range of skills, opinions and perspectives would come into play as they consulted with faculty and shaped the project plan (Sibley, J., Ostafichuk, P., Roberson, B., Franchini, Kubitzv, B., Michaelsen, L., 2014).

From these places they will discuss both the content expertise they brought to the project, but also how they come to their work from a place of empathy and care. Discussing both the barriers to change and the successes they have experienced in this project, the presenters intend to create a larger narrative around change management in program and faculty enhancement. This session also intends to engage the audience in a discussion, eliciting from participants their own experiences with change management—their challenges, successes and relevant strategies. In this way, we hope participants leave with a greater understanding of the “soft” side of faculty development, as well as some strategies to use moving forward.  

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Bortolin

Kathleen Bortolin

Curriculum, Teaching and Learning Specialist, Vancouver Island University
avatar for Sally Vinden

Sally Vinden

Curriculum, Teaching & Learning Specialist, Vancouver Island University
Trades and Vocational Education and Training (TVET)Curriculum and Pedagogy International Development of TVET


Tuesday May 29, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am AKDT
Ballroom 2

10:30am AKDT

Teaching an Online Instructional Design Course Using Design Thinking: Successes and Challenges
Speakers
avatar for Dr. Amy Zidulka

Dr. Amy Zidulka

Associate Professor, Royal Roads University
I teach and research in the areas of creativity and innovation, focusing both on how people innovate at work and on how educators might foster creative skills and confidence. I have worked since 2001 at Royal Roads, where I have been situated primarily in the business school but have... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am AKDT
Port of Hong Kong

10:30am AKDT

The View from the Inside the Bubble: Exploring and Augmenting 360° Images
Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptop to this session

This session begins where 2017’s ETUG - Beyond a Toy: 360° Experiential Learning - left off. That session delved into how viewing 360° video had an immersive quality that could encourage meaningful connections to a topic. This mode permits class trips to anywhere in the world all within the space of a smartphone and Virtual Reality viewer.

The next step in the pedagogical journey switches the student’s role from passive viewer to creator and editor of 360° spaces.

In part one of the proposed session, attendees would view some of the best student created 360° projects from Camosun this academic year. Students have gone out into their community and documented diverse concepts from their classes, like tidal movements or patriarchy, in actions – via 360° images. What’s more, these groups then augmented a string of 360° spaces – bubbles – with text information, 2D photos, soundscapes, quotes, poems, and video.

In part two of the session, attendees will be invited into a series of pre-shot 360° images. From inside these bubbles, attendees will be taught how to augment these spaces – via Holobuilder.com, a US based virtual reality company who Camosun works with. After a short round of instruction, attendees will be encouraged to explore, play, and design their bubbles with the many tools Holobuilder makes available. The goal is to not only to have attendees get their hands and heads inside a thought bubble, but also to have attendees consider how they might bring 360° image augmentation to their classrooms and institutions. Instructors may consider having students explore an augmented 360° space the instructor has created. Others may ask students to define and delineate a 360° bubble – as a mapping project might. The goal will be to generate a discussion on the potential and pitfalls for this type of learning.

Ultimately, most disciplines aspire to have their students see the world through a variety of unique lenses that their discipline teaches. This project permits students to capture and describe these paradigms in the world around them.

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Reeve

Daniel Reeve

Political Science Instructor, Camosun College
Applied learning, indigenization, and digital pedagogy are the three main axis which I'm trying to bring to life in the classrooms I'm part of. I wonder how classes can facilitate more creativity. I wish I know how to facilitate learning activities that encouraged failure positive... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm AKDT
Port of San Francisco

10:30am AKDT

Including all Learners through Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in Higher Education
The Full Inclusion Movement (FIM) grew out of grassroots disability movements where caregivers of children with special learning needs wanted their loved ones to be included in regular classrooms. The BC Ministry of Education has mandated that teachers within the K -12 public education systems implement the Full Inclusion model when teaching children and youth. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is the theoretical framework that enables educators to meet all students’ learning needs within a generalist setting. The inquiry that is of interest to teacher educators and scholars, Dr. Nan Stevens and Dr. Gloria Ramirez at Thompson Rivers University, is how UDL methods can improve teaching and learning in the post secondary context.

This session will begin with an overview of Universal Design for Learning, a research-based set of principles (multiple means of engagement, representation, action and expression) that guide curriculum development and pedagogical practices that make learning accessible to learners with diverse characteristics (e.g., cognitive, cultural, linguistic) and needs.

Through concrete examples, we will explore practical ideas and strategies to promote accessible learning environments guided by UDL in undergraduate and graduate courses. This exploration will cover course syllabi, classroom activities, and assessment strategies.

Examples from undergraduate and graduate courses include:
  • Multiple means of engagement: small group work, gallery walk, in-class collaborative activity using Google docs.
  • Multiple means of representation: dancing statistics, open coding jelly beans video, other videos, caption for audios and videos, research provocations seminars, Moodle platform, dramatic representation, photo-voice, and journaling
  • Multiple means of action and expression: Online discussion forums, index cards for silent participation, Be the Expert peer assessment, oral presentations, Synchronous and asynchronous online video conferences, introduction through personal video, introduction through a poem, monologue or photo essay. 

The session will close with an interactive, facilitated, critical discussion on opportunities and challenges for the implementation of UDL in higher education. Participants will be able to participate actively by asking questions and providing insights into shared resources for implementing UDL as an inclusive model for learning in higher education.


Speakers
DN

Dr. Nan Stevens

Senior Lecturer, TRU
I am a teacher educator teaching in Bachelor and Masters of Education programs at TRU. My specialty us inclusion and disability studies. I work with beginning teachers on UDL practices, creating sensory smart classrooms and differentiating instruction for diverse learning... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm AKDT
Port of Singapore

10:30am AKDT

Integrating Creative and Critical Thinking into Your Course
Every college in North America professes that the students who complete their program are creative and critical thinkers. Further, employers expect students to be competent thinkers. Luckily, these two skills can be taught and developed.

This workshop will focus on practical ways to foster creative and critical thinking. Participants will develop a better understanding of these two constructs, strategies to foster their development, and ways to assess. Further, in a collegial, collaborative, environment participants will work together to plan how to implement meaningful strategies into their courses. 

Speakers
avatar for Peter Arthur

Peter Arthur

University of British Columbia Okanagan


Tuesday May 29, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 3

10:30am AKDT

Liberating Structures: Unleash and Include Everyone
Liberating Structures are powerful facilitation strategies that can be used to support classrooms, workshops, presentations, meetings, planning sessions, and ongoing complex organizational change.

They are "serious fun" ways to unleash and include everyone in conversations, learning, and decision-making. Liberating Structures invite us to consider alternatives to “conventional structures” (e.g. lectures, unstructured discussions, round robin status updates) and lead active, participatory sessions that quickly foster lively engagement in inclusive groups of any size.  

Join us for a fast-paced session where you will experience the four most-used Liberating Structures used in BC post-secondary education settings, and consider how you might use them in your work!

Resources for participants
  • Report (pdf):  Liberating Structures in BC Higher Ed - How is it Spreading? 

Speakers
avatar for Beth Cougler Blom

Beth Cougler Blom

Beth Cougler Blom
avatar for Barish Golland

Barish Golland

Operations Manager, Learning Technology Ecosystems, UBC Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia
I get excited about finding ways to improve learning with technology that doesn't get in the way. I love using Liberating Structures to engage everyone in finding productive ways forward, enabling connection and idea flow. On the side I'm passionate about STEM in K-12 and volunteer... Read More →
avatar for Leva Lee

Leva Lee

Manager, BCcampus
In addition to the BCcampus Online Book Club (bccampusonlinebookclub.opened.ca) and ETUG History (etug.ca), feel free to ask me about stewarding communities of practice; the BCcampus Learning Access Program for Educators (LAP-E); the Scholarly Teaching and Ed Tech Fellows Programs... Read More →
avatar for Tracy Roberts

Tracy Roberts

Director, Learning & Teaching, BCcampus



Tuesday May 29, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm AKDT
Port of New York

10:30am AKDT

Storytelling for Care: Using Stories to Facilitate Good Pedagogy and Design
Note: This is a 3-hour session - the first half (90 min) is before lunch, and the second half (90 min) is after lunch.

Educational institutions lend themselves to siloed ways of seeing reality. Teams that lack common view and values often fail by producing results that are inappropriate and ineffective, despite the hard work, talents, and investment of all involved.

In this session, we will explore collective storytelling as a means of cultivating shared understanding, surfacing shared values, and enabling collective action. We argue that such coming together is prerequisite to effective, appropriate, and ethical design and pedagogy. By inviting us to imagine people and the worlds they inhabit in rich and detailed ways, we believe that stories can support us to think in careful and caring ways. The session will start with a brief presentation about our experiences using stories to guide our work around open educational practices at the University of Alberta. We will share our experiences using stories in a group, composed of diverse stakeholders across campus, to achieve a high degree of cohesion and shared vision. During this hands-on workshop, participants will be given a design challenge related to open-educational practices and care. Through a series of facilitated storytelling activities, teams will develop a design proposal for presentation and discussion with the larger group. In a debriefing phase, participants will reflect on the potential applications of storytelling in collaborative professional contexts.  

Speakers
avatar for Michael Cenkner

Michael Cenkner

Academic Technology Specialist, University of Alberta
Teaching and learning! Educational technology. Story development. Heart-brain coherence. Non-violent communication (NVC). Pedagogy. Interactivity for engagement, engaged learning. Design of all kinds.Interdisciplinarity. Humanist values in technology. Story in all its empowering and... Read More →
avatar for Patrick von Hauff

Patrick von Hauff

Academic Technology Specialist, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta
I am a professional designer who works in health science education.


Tuesday May 29, 2018 10:30am - 2:45pm AKDT
Tuscany Room

11:20am AKDT

Delivering a Better Experience by Using the Open, Collaborative and Flexible Grav CMS – Inside or Outside of your LMS
Want to provide students and course facilitators a better online experience but still want or need to use the existing institutional LMS? Faced with this exact challenge, Paul Hibbitts started to develop a set of components in 2016 for the modern Grav Content Management System (getgrav.org) to partner with his institution's LMS (Canvas). Grav leverages forward-looking standards such as Markdown for platform-independent content and enables Git-based (i.e. GitHub, GitLab, GitBook, etc.) collaborative workflows, both which naturally also supports the 5 Rs of Open Educational Resources. In addition, the ability to use GitHub Desktop (desktop.github.com) for mirroring Git-based content to one’s own computer for backup and editing with the tools of your choice not only brings peace of mind but also a highly efficient workflow.

Paul has also been very fortunate to have the opportunity to iteratively develop his Grav CMS projects for use with his 3rd year CMPT-363 User Interface Design (canvas.sfu.ca/courses/38847) class at Simon Fraser University, where students provided ongoing input and feedback. The Grav CMS, as well as Paul’s custom components, are freely available as open source software (learn.hibbittsdesign.org and on GitHub) for other tech-savvy educators to use and build upon.

In this session, Paul will give an overview of the Grav CMS and highlight when it is an appealing alternative to many traditional CMSs, including WordPress. He will also explore the Grav Open Course Hub project and demonstrate how they can benefit tech-savvy educators and students - both inside and outside of their institutional LMS. If time permits, he will also introduce several other Open-related Grav Projects, including Open Publishing Space, Learn2 with Git Sync, H5P Shortcode and the Hypothesis Plugin.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Hibbitts

Paul Hibbitts

Educator, Interaction Designer and Open Source Author, SFU / Hibbitts Design


Tuesday May 29, 2018 11:20am - 12:05pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

11:20am AKDT

Learning to Bounce: Teaching Resilience in the Undergraduate Classroom
This workshop will explore how instructors can help their students to become more resilient learners through the use of what Gregory Walton (2014) terms “wise interventions”—stealthy and focused interventions whose aim is to change specific psychological processes that inhibit students from thriving. Among parents, teachers, and university administrators, there is a growing concern that today’s undergraduates are lacking resilience—an essential academic skill that allows students to become fully empowered learners. This session will begin by introducing Stanford’s “Resilience Project” and the Resilience Research Consortium to which Stanford and other universities across North America belong. These schools believe that resilience is skill that can be taught and have undertaken the important work of finding ways of teaching resilience to undergraduates. By helping our students to become more resilient, to help them see resilience as a skill that can be learned, we are not only empowering our students for the duration of their academic careers, but we are also effecting lasting and life-long change. First, I will briefly discuss my own “Bounce Project” and my SOTL research (funded by my university’s Learning and Teaching Centre) that uses Walton’s study of “wise interventions” to increase resilience in undergraduates through short writing exercises in a first-year Intro. to Academic Writing class. Next, I will ask small groups of participants to work together to share their understandings of what it means to be resilient and to behave resiliently. We will then come back together to share our ideas and to better understand what we mean when we discuss resilience in the context of an academic environment. What kinds of resilient behaviours do they as teachers model in the classroom? What kinds of “wise interventions” could they include in their own curriculum? What kinds of “wise interventions” have they tried? We will then once again engage in a group discussion and share our findings with each other in an effort to find ways to teach resilience to our students and to help students to “learn to bounce.”

Speakers
RG

Rebecca Gagan

Rebecca Gagan is an Assistant Teaching Professor in the Department of English at The University of Victoria.


Tuesday May 29, 2018 11:20am - 12:05pm AKDT
Port of Hong Kong

12:05pm AKDT

BCTLC Spring Members Meeting
Spring Members Meeting Agenda

Note:
lunch will be available from 11:30 onwards. If you find yourself free before noon, beat the rush to get your lunch well before our meeting!

1. Strategic Doing Updates - 30 min
Liesel/Maureen (K-12) 
Carrie Nolan (Pebble Project)
Janni (FIPPA)


2. FYIs/news items (10 min)
Symposium: Oct 24 at SFU HC (need program committee/adjudicators, ideas for keynote speakers)
Fall Members Meeting: Oct 25 at The Met Hotel

3. BCTLC Leadership/Chair change (5 min)

Maureen Wideman & Theresa Southam outgoing
Janni Aragon and Grant Gregson incoming chairs

Speakers
avatar for Grant Gregson

Grant Gregson

Coordinator Teaching and Learning Centre, Emily Carr University of Art + Design
Grant is the Coordinator of Emily Carr University of Art + Design’s Teaching and Learning Centre, innovating and developing an elearning and professional learning infrastructure to support faculty and staff with curriculum design, delivery, and professional/personal learning. He... Read More →
avatar for Theresa Southam

Theresa Southam

Coordinator, Teaching and Learning Institute, Selkirk College
Theresa Southam is the Coordinator of the Teaching and Learning Institute (TLI) at Selkirk College. She has a Masters in Intercultural Communication from Royal Roads University and is enrolled in a PhD program in Human and Organizational Development at Fielding University. She is... Read More →
avatar for Maureen Wideman

Maureen Wideman

Associate Vice President, Teaching and Learning, University of the Fraser Valley
Maureen has spent more than 25 years in the teaching and learning field beginning as an instructional designer, faculty member, director and now AVP. She approaches faculty development as a student success initiative and maintains the learner-centred approach in all she does. Her... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 12:05pm - 1:00pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

12:05pm AKDT

Lunch
BUILD YOUR OWN SALAD & SANDWICH BAR

Salad:
  • Hand Select Fraser Valley Greens 
  • Green Goddess Dressing & Balsamic Vinaigrette 
  • Traditional Greek Salad with Feta Cheese 
  • Kalamata & Mediterranean Olives 
  • Classic Caesar, Crisp Romaine, Herb Croutons, Shaved Reggiano, 
  • House Dressing 

Sandwiches: 
  • Baguette, Ciabatta & Wraps 
  • Cilantro Chicken Salad
  • Shaved Ham
  • Sliced Tomato, Swiss Cheese, Gouda Cheese, Cucumber & Hummus 
 
Beverages:
Freshly Brewed Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee & Teas
Orange Juice & Grapefruit Juice

Dessert:
Chia Seed Parfait with Berries (V)


Tuesday May 29, 2018 12:05pm - 1:15pm AKDT
Ballroom 1

12:15pm AKDT

Mini Yoga Break (15 min)
  • Enjoy a 15 minute Mini Yoga Break (chair and standing Yoga). These are a great pick-me-up to help rejuvenate your mind and body.
  • Business attire is suitable for the class.
  • Relieves neck and shoulder tension, back pain and tight hips.
  • Transforms fatigue to alertness, stamina and greater productivity.
  • Boosts concentration to more effectively absorb the material being presented.

*All levels welcome!

Moderators
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Tuesday May 29, 2018 12:15pm - 12:30pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

12:30pm AKDT

12:30pm AKDT

Poster Plus!
NEW TIME/PLACE: Poster Plus! Sessions available/set up from 12:30 - 2:50.

All Festival participants are invited to drop in over lunch, in between, or instead of scheduled sessions, any time between 12:30 - 2:50pm.  Come and see this impressive showcase of projects, chat with presenters, and get your questions answered on the spot.
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  • 12 Apps: Exploring educational technology in small places (Keith Webster)
The 12 Apps of Christmas presented by BCcampus and ETUG were a light opportunity to explore a few new tools and perhaps come away with an idea to enliven your teaching. The short presentations on each App, and how they can be used in teaching and learning are effective openings into new technologies for teaching and learning. In this presentation we will explore the way the 12 Apps event unfolded, and how short activities based on a single tool can leverage wider discussions about educational technology, instructional design, and the integration of both. Along the way we'll weave a few mobile tools into the presentation as it unfolds.

  • Power Engineering and Cloud-based Simulator Training: From Servers in the Netherlands to BCIT, Burnaby &  Beyond (Serhat Beyenir & Sanja Boskovic)
We will demonstrate a system for implementation and simulation of a large power plant using a cloud-based simulator. In the demonstration, we will connect to virtual machines located in the Netherlands and run various conditions in the simulated power plant. In the second half of presentation, we will examine the possibilities and roles that cloud-based simulations might play in power engineering education and its potential implications in future regulations. By looking at how simulator-based training is used and accredited in such fields as marine engineering, nautical sciences, aerospace technologies and health sciences, we will suggest a new framework in which a cloud-based training can offer anytime, anywhere, any device, autonomous and accredited simulator training for power engineers. For effective learning, there should be a perfect balance between ease of use, learning curve, time constraints and compatibility with other software in order to build a unified learning system for the student and instructor in which technology is invisible.

  • The Cultural Dimensions of Consumption OER textbook (Jody Baker)
This online open education resource includes images, audio and video learning components. An open textbook in the field of advertising and consumer culture can be adaptable and dynamic to respond to a shifting landscape of advertising and promotion. This platform allows for ongoing, open contribution and should be remixable and adaptable for a range of educational contexts. To address cultural dimensions of advertising requires text, image, audio and video, thus moving beyond the traditional printed textbook.
This text is intended to be used in undergraduate courses in advertising and consumer culture studies. It introduces the learner to a range of critical and analytical approaches. Relevant and current examples of print and video advertising and promotion are key to connecting abstract, theoretical, conceptual tools to the real world of advertising – making theory concrete. Short analytical videos demonstrate how theoretical concepts are applied to the analysis of a range of strategies, brands, modes of address and cultural engagement in contemporary consumer culture. Diverse, student-centred learning methods are facilitated with text, visual and audio components that engage the learner on several dimensions.
Topics include: the commodity form; semiotic analysis; brands as platform for identity and action; dimensions of self and identity; youth counter-cultures; taste and class; spatial dimensions of promotion; branded activism; corporate relations.

We will demonstrate our online platform as a means to incorporate multi-media within a dynamic, open textbook format within a dynamic field of study.

  • UBC Food Systems Case Studies: Enhancing Experiential Learning Using Food Systems Assets (Meryn Corkery)
It was once said that “health requires healthy food” (Roger Williams, American theologian). Since then, researchers and educational institutions have been exploring the links between access to healthy, nutritious food and student academic performance and behavior. The open educational resources presented in this Poster Plus Presentation—the UBC Food Systems Case Studies—aim to increase the capacity for students to actively engage with their food systems and, ultimately, their health.

The UBC Food Systems Case Studies Poster Plus Presentation session will: (1) describe the process through which the case studies were developed with the aim to equip and inspire others to recreate, (2) present how UBC instructors from a diversity of disciplines are currently using the case studies, and (3) engage the audience in a discussion on how the open, place-based case studies template could be adapted to learning outcomes and educators beyond UBC.

  • Learning How to Learn: Embedding online learning skills content into courses to support student success  (Christina Page, Emily Tan & Anmol Kaur Mangat)
This poster highlights the current work of the KPU Learning Centre to develop learning strategies materials using an OER model. The OER resource, along with the development of online learning strategies mini-workshops, presents opportunities for flexible, well integrated student learning support. This model allows faculty to select and implement relevant modules and embed these into their course via their learning management system. An additional benefit is the way in which this model can significantly improve access to learning skills support for non-traditional and working students.

The purpose of the poster session is to allow participants to explore three types of online study skills resources that can be embedded into existing courses, and to evaluate the potential for adopting these or similar resources to support students in their own contexts.

  • 8 Dimensions of Wellbeing - Student to Student Engagement (Dean Diamond)
BCIT has committed to researching, developing, and implementing strategies for student success. Recent practice within Post-Secondary Health Promotion confirms that positive wellbeing is a key predictor for learning and student success. Practice also indicates that there are many areas of action – learning environments, physical spaces, policy, services, personal growth, and community engagement. The BCIT Student Life Office recently implemented a student staff program incorporating three of these action areas: services, personal growth, and community engagement. Student staff are hired, trained in the fundamentals of health promotion and the science of wellbeing, and supported to design and run student-to-student engagement programming using a ‘whole person’ 8 Dimensions of Wellbeing framework.

  • Can I have support with that? The ed tech's guide to caring (Kelly Diether)
The poster presentation will invite participants to follow along a set of scenarios, including a student in a first-year Engineering course that is frantic about their assignment being submitted onto the University’s Learning Management System and a sessional instructor that has questions about privacy that they are not comfortable asking their department. Participants will be able to choose when and where they apply “care” to the situation, and the outcome of the scenario will depend on what the participant chose. By having theoretical outcomes to these scenarios, I hope to show that evoking care in your academic role is not only easy to do, but is also so worthwhile.

Speakers
avatar for Serhat Beyenir

Serhat Beyenir

Instructor, Power Engineering, BCIT
I am an instructor at the Power Engineering Group of BCIT where I maintain web-based online courses and tutor distance education learners. I also teach in the Power and Process Engineering program. I am an open source software (OSS) advocate and open textbook proponent: I began using... Read More →
avatar for Sanja Boskovic

Sanja Boskovic

Associate Dean, BCIT - ATC
The Sustainable Engineer, I am not a typical engineer. Raised in Yugoslavia and educated in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Sarajevo, I was one of the few women practicing in engineering in my country. But that was just the beginning. I had an amazing journey through... Read More →
avatar for Kelly Diether

Kelly Diether

Educational Technology Support Specialist, University of Victoria
avatar for Christina Page

Christina Page

Learning Strategist, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
avatar for Keith Webster

Keith Webster

Associate Director - Learning Technologies, Royal Roads University
I have been an educator for several decades. As an instructor in the Canadian Forces, with a brief turn as a high school teacher, becoming an educational technologist and instructional designer at the University of Victoria in 2004. I became an instructional designer at Royal Roads... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 12:30pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Ballroom 1

12:45pm AKDT

Mini Yoga Break (15 min)
  • Enjoy a 15 minute Mini Yoga Break (chair and standing Yoga). These are a great pick-me-up to help rejuvenate your mind and body.
  • Business attire is suitable for the class.
  • Relieves neck and shoulder tension, back pain and tight hips.
  • Transforms fatigue to alertness, stamina and greater productivity.
  • Boosts concentration to more effectively absorb the material being presented.

*All levels welcome!

Moderators
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Tuesday May 29, 2018 12:45pm - 1:00pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

1:15pm AKDT

Kids Yoga
Time for a little stretch for our youngest conference attendees. Classes adapted to this age group and will be lead by the Festival's certified yoga instructor.

Speakers
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga


Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:15pm - 1:45pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

1:15pm AKDT

Blackboard Ally: Accessibility Training, and Remediation, and Tracking
Summary
Blackboard Ally seamlessly integrates into various Learning Management Systems to improve accessibility of digital course content and track progress made over time. Ally promotes accessible course design from the start by flagging inaccessible materials and providing feedback and instructions for remediation, in addition to providing alternative formats that best meet students’ individual needs.

Abstract

In response to recent state and local policies, the Washington State community and technical college system has been working to improve accessibility in all areas, but specifically in the area of online instruction. To help with this effort, the system first piloted Ally with 7 colleges, followed by a system-wide roll-out of the tool.

 
Ally is integrated in Canvas, allowing faculty to scan their courses for accessibility problem areas. Using Ally’s feedback feature, faculty are given the guidance on how to make their materials more accessible. Additionally, Ally enables faculty and students to download alternative formats for various course materials. From an institutional standpoint, Ally is able to track the improvements and progress made over time.

In this presentation, we’ll demonstrate Ally’s feature set in Canvas and discuss the feedback and experience from faculty, staff, and students involved in the pilots and system-wide roll-out.

Key Points

  • Blackboard Ally can meet the needs of faculty by providing immediate evaluation and guidance on making accessible content.
  • Blackboard Ally can meet the needs of students by allowing them to download the alternative format of their choice. 
  • Blackboard Ally can meet the needs of administration by tracking institutional progress made towards increased accessibility. 

Speakers
avatar for Nicolaas Matthijs

Nicolaas Matthijs

Product Director, Blackboard
Nicolaas Matthijs is an entrepreneur and product creator with over 10 years of experience in Educational Technology. Nicolaas has worked at several leading R1 institutions such as Cambridge University, UC Berkeley and Georgia Tech, where he developed Learning Management Systems, Academic... Read More →
avatar for Jess Thompson

Jess Thompson

Program Administrator, Accessible Technology Initiatives, Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges


Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm AKDT
Port of San Francisco

1:15pm AKDT

Launching Canada’s First Zed Cred programs: Motivations, Strategies, and Next Steps
A “Zed Cred” refers to a degree pathway that involves zero textbook costs, based on the adoption of open educational resources (e.g., open textbooks) or use of institutionally subscribed resources (e.g., library databases). Pioneered at Tidewater Community College, research has shown significant gains in student enrolment, persistence, and performance from this programmatic approach to OER adoption (Hilton et al., 2016)..

In 2017 BCcampus awarded Zed Cred grants to three BC institutions--Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU), Thompson Rivers University, Open Learning (TRU-OL), and the Justice Institute of British Columbia (JIBC). Whereas the JIBC is developing a two-year cohort-based Law Enforcement Studies diploma, KPU and TRU are both developing flexible one-year credentials that provide a foundation for further study (the Certificate of Arts and Certificate of General Studies, respectively).

Aside from being the first Zed Cred initiatives in the country, they are distinguished by the collaborative approach of the cross-functional teams behind them. Aside from reusing, revising, and remixing existing OER, these teams are actively looking for opportunities to co-develop and peer-review resources as well as share strategies used to build institutional capacity (e.g., faculty and staff training), overcome challenges (e.g., integrating a Zed Cred notation in course timetables), conduct research (e.g., to evaluate the institutional impact of OER adoption), and develop a strategic framework.

In this interactive panel, members of KPU, TRU, and JIBC’s cross functional Zed Cred teams will share their motivations for embarking on these initiatives, highlight unique aspects of each of their Zed Creds, discuss challenges and the strategies deployed to overcome them, forecast their next steps, and invite attendees to collaborate with them where feasible.

Speakers
avatar for Naomi Cloutier

Naomi Cloutier

Associate Director Curriculum Services, Thompson Rivers University
The nuts and bolts of course development and sustainability with a team of course preparation experts keeps me awake all day. How do these areas unfold at your institution/organization? What are the opportunities for collaboration, staff exchange, or brainstorming new how-tos? When... Read More →
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Associate Vice President, Teaching & Learning, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
avatar for Krista Lambert

Krista Lambert

Designer: Learning or Instructional, Justice Institute of British Columbia
avatar for Todd Mundle

Todd Mundle

University Librarian, KPU


Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 2

1:15pm AKDT

Making Pressbooks Better for Making Open Textbooks
The open-source software Pressbooks has been improving its feature set for educational users, most notably those who are creating and remixing open textbooks. In August 2017, Pressbooks released a cloning tool that allows users to quickly and easily copy a complete Pressbooks book (with all the metadata, content, images) at the click of a button. This improves the potential reach of each open textbook that is created and allows books to become more modular and easily adaptable for a broader range of courses. Pressbooks has also been working on a new and improved web book (coming January 2018), as well as new landing and book catalog pages for educational networks. In the year ahead, we’ll be building additional features for faculty authoring open textbooks or monographs, such as indexing and glossary tools. In this session, find out what’s new, and what else is coming to improve the ease of formatting open educational resources including textbooks, monographs and more.

Speakers
avatar for Zoe Wake Hyde

Zoe Wake Hyde

Product Manager, Rebus Community


Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

1:15pm AKDT

Putting Students First in a Changing Open Movement
The open educational resources (OER) movement has grown considerably in the past decade. With this growth, we have seen new players enter the open education space from commercial publishers to learning platform companies. The entrance of these new players into the space is part of a larger shift in the course materials market as technology has changed both access to knowledge and the way students learn. New actors are putting considerable pressure on institutions to purchase new platforms and suites of materials below market price that often contain OER. Some of these platforms for delivery are part of a larger model often called “inclusive access” or “digital discount” programs. These new models and products beg the question, “what is actually best for students?” Providing open educational resources to students without barriers is truly the best way to ensure students have access to the materials they need. How do we make smart decisions on content and content delivery with changing technology and new actors in the OER space? This session will outline existing and new players in the OER movement and discuss strategies for choosing content delivery models.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Director of Open Education, SPARC
Nicole Allen is the Director of Open Education at SPARC, a global coalition working to make open the default in research and education. A decade and a half ago, Nicole was an undergraduate student frustrated with the cost of textbooks. Today, she is an internationally recognized policy... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm AKDT
Port of New York

1:15pm AKDT

Education for the Masses: How Massive we Would Like to Be?
Faculty of Education at UBC has been present in the online educational spaces for almost two decades. The University of British Columbia’s push for flexible learning initiatives in 2014 resulted in the creation of a few MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses), one of them being designed in the Faculty of Education. Reconciliation through Indigenous Education was offered for the first time in 2015 and just had its fifth iteration.

Two years later, the general public was provided with another opportunity to learn, as we launched Bringing Mental Health to Schools this October. In both cases the target audience are in-service teachers, lacking deeper knowledge, guidance and strategies to deal with sensitive subjects. The choice of topics suggests that the Faculty of Education is taking a route of “educating the masses” by contributing to personal growth and nurturing human relations, thus taking part in shaping a better world for the humanity as a whole.

When we have such a noble goal, what is the expected outcome and how massive is massive enough? Transformative education takes time and personal effort, but is the one that makes a difference. Is that the reason why Faculty of Education at UBC has managed to break the usual stats related to MOOCs, such as the percent of verified participants, and the completion rate?
What are the factors that contribute to the success of these new professional development opportunities?

In this presentation we will have the opportunity to look at UBC’s experiences with these courses, but also engage in a larger dialogue about learners and course design, through small group discussions, pair-share. 

Speakers
avatar for Natasha Boskic

Natasha Boskic

Director, Learning Design and Sessional Instructor, University of British Columbia
My main areas of engagement are technology-enhanced learning, instructional design, and professional development. My specific areas of focus are online collaboration and communication strategies, student engagement, different delivery models and culturally-responsive instruction... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm AKDT
Port of Hong Kong

1:15pm AKDT

Sharing the B.C. OER Paddling Together: A Guide for Indigenizing of Post-secondary Institution. A Professional Learning Series
Created in 2016 – 2017 by Indigenous thought-leaders and educators in British Columbia, this open professional learning series was developed to support the Indigenization of post-secondary institutions in the Province. Sponsored by the Ministry of Advanced Education, Skills and Training to support Goal 1 in the Aboriginal Post-Secondary Education and Training Policy Framework and Action Plan: 2020 Vision: “systemic changes means that the public post-secondary education system is relevant, responsive, respectful and receptive to Aboriginal learners and communities.” The presenters will share the role of BCcampus in this project and in the open movement; how an Indigenized Quadrant Model was applied to guide content development for leaders and administrators, front line staff, researchers, curriculum developers and faculty; and how the use of Pressbooks facilitates easy use and reuse of this OER. The session will hold time for questions. 

Speakers
avatar for Dianne Biin

Dianne Biin

Project Manager, developer for the Indigenization Project, BCcampus
avatar for Michelle Glubke

Michelle Glubke

Senior Manager, Collaborative Projects, BCcampus
avatar for Lucas Wright

Lucas Wright

Open Strategist (Leave Appointment), BCcampus
UBC


Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 3

1:15pm AKDT

Critical Thinking in the Age of Alternate Facts
In a world of conspiracy theories, alternate facts and fake news it can be difficult for students to separate truth from fiction.

In this workshop we will examine biases, evidence, fallacies (there are more than 20 of them) in order to help students detect baloney and become better critical thinkers.
We will have explanations and demonstrations of critical thinking tools, discussions, group thinking exercises, short videos and voting exercises.

Speakers

Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:15pm - 2:45pm AKDT
Port of Singapore

1:50pm AKDT

Quiet Reflection & Meditation Drop-in
This is an open time/space for quiet reflection and/or meditation.

Festival attendees are invited to drop in for any length of time. 

We encourage people to "check their devices" at the door, but portable devices with headphones to support your meditation or other quiet reflective practices are permitted. 

Tuesday May 29, 2018 1:50pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

2:00pm AKDT

Booked: Jon Fulton
Speakers
avatar for Jon Fulton

Jon Fulton

Video Producer, Thompson Rivers University
Jon is a video producer for Thompson Rivers University, Open Learning. He creates pedagogically-driven media pieces for distance courses. His business card should read "Image Acquisition and Manipulation," although he also has extensive experience in audio manipulation, once creating... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 2:00pm - 2:30pm AKDT
Port of Shanghai (Boardroom)

2:05pm AKDT

Creating a Flexible Hybrid Learning Environment: Using Video Conferencing Technology
The University of the Fraser Valley Adult Education Program offers flexible schedules for Adult Education students offering all courses online. This combination of hybrid and fully online model allows distance students to participate synchronously in face-to-face offerings through Blackboard Collaborate Ultra (video conferencing).

In order to facilitate this model, the Teaching and Learning Centre at UFV worked with the Adult Education Faculty to create a specialized learning environment equipped with video cameras and microphones in order to accommodate students participating from a distance through Blackboard Collaborate Ultra. Remote students and students with barriers to mobility have benefitted from this model.

The Teaching and Learning Centre developed resources & workshops to support both instructors and students in managing the technology and user interface. In addition, a New Faculty Orientation (NFO) for Adult Ed instructors included best practices to assist faculty in creating one learning community that incorporates both face-to-face and virtual classrooms.

In this workshop, Educational Developer, Michelle Johnson and Educational Technologist, Ken Harmel will:
  • Share the evolution of the model over the last 5 years, tips, best practices, lessons learned, and a look into the future of this hybrid classroom.
  • Demonstrate a classroom activity that involves participation between virtual and face-to-face participants using Blackboard Collaborate Ultra (video conferencing)
  • Discussion and sharing about hybrid learning models
During the presentation we will be using a Padlet. Please click Join Padlet Discussion to post your ideas.

Speakers
avatar for Ken Harmel

Ken Harmel

Educational Technologist Extraordinaire, UFV
I’m working alongside an excellent team of educators and support staff who are devoted to the success of UFV’s students and the future of our local and global communities. Getting here started in 2000 when I launched my professional teaching career in Japan. Thirteen years later... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Johnson

Michelle Johnson

Educational Developer, University of the Fraser Valley
Michelle Johnson is an Educational Developer and part of the Teaching and Learning team at the University of the Fraser Valley. She has a background in Graphic Design and customer service. She is currently working towards two goals: a Masters in Learning and Technology and the implementation... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

2:05pm AKDT

.Innovative Education in Sustainable Forest Management
This project will demonstrate how UBC Forestry uses open educational resources developed through international collaboration to benefit UBC students and provide accessible forestry education to global learners.

Challenges such as climate change and deforestation have created high demand for sustainable forest management (SFM), and access to relevant education is important for improving forest management and nurturing new generation practitioners. To improve the capacity building of SFM, starting in 2014 the Faculty of Forestry, has led the development of a joint educational program entitled Innovative Sustainable Forest Management Education in the Asia-Pacific Region which includes the development of a series of five self-directed online courses with its content as open educational resources (OER). In the first phase of the program, five international renowned forestry universities including UBC, Beijing Forestry University, University of Melbourne, University Putra Malaysia, and University of the Philippines Los Baños had worked together to apply new educational technology and innovative pedagogical method for conveying SFM knowledge to a global audience.

As open educational resources, all courses in this program can be re-purposed entirely or partially in support of flipped or blended classroom approaches, as well as future credential programs. Given those features, the Faculty of Forestry has used the courses in various ways to improve teaching and learning. Since 2016, this program has attracted over 3300 interested learners including students, faculty members and professionals from 90 countries around the world. The program won the CNIE-RCIE Award in the category of Excellence and Innovation in the Integration of Technology in Educational Practices/Collaboration. We believe this project will provide useful experience and information on improving equity in forestry education worldwide.

We will showcase the project with video lectures, infographic and invited guest speakers. Q & A will be arranged to interact with audiences.

Speakers
DG

Dr. Guangyu Wang

Associate Dean of Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia


Tuesday May 29, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Port of New York

2:05pm AKDT

Design in Mind—Using Design Thinking for More than you can Imagine
This session is a fast-paced, immersive experience into the Design Thinking Mindset. Using a mash-up of approaches, this format is a unique template that walks participants through the five pillars of design thinking: Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype, Test; with an emphasis on the Empathetic Interview. Baked-in concepts borrowed from Liberating Structures, Institute of Innovation in Education, Stanford Design School, Future Design School. A multi-modal mash-up with multiple access points and a myriad of applications.

I'll be bringing examples of past participants "out loud" thinking, and talk about the sorts of challenges I have seen addressed-- successfully!-- with a Design Thinking approach.

Tuesday May 29, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Port of San Francisco

2:05pm AKDT

Pop-up Community of Practice for Accessibility in Post-Secondary Education
As post-secondary educators, we know that one key aspect of creating inclusive learning opportunities for all our students is ensuring that our course materials are “accessible”. But as the saying goes, the “devil’s in the details” and many of us struggle with the practical implementation of accessibility standards and requirements. For example, how do we make complex visuals like graphs and charts accessible to all students? Or how do we make closed-captioning in video materials available if we don’t know how to actually create and add those captions?

This session will focus on collaboratively confronting these and other fundamental challenges associated with accessibility in post-secondary education. We will employ a Community of Practice-type format with the goal of identifying strategies or processes we can all use to address some of the most common challenges we encounter in making our online learning experiences accessible to all students.

Facilitators for this session will guide this Community of Practice to create strategies and processes that are:
  • user-friendly , 
  • practical/applicable, and 
  • sustainable (& cost-effective)

All ideas and outcomes generated by this pop-up Community of Practice will be shared openly with the broader BC PSE community after the event.

Goals for this Community of Practice
We hope to collaboratively brainstorm options, approaches and processes we can all adopt to address such accessibility-related challenges as:

  1. CLOSED CAPTIONING –

    We all know we need to include closed-captions in any educational video materials we create but what do we do if we don’t know how to add these or if we don’t have a ready captioning service available at our institution? 
  2. INFOGRAPHICS – 

    Graphs, charts, maps and other complex visuals can be a great way to make a lot of information easy to digest but what do we need to provide for those who can’t see these infographics for one reason or another? And how do we provide that?
  3. ADOPTING NEW EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY –

    When your institution is considering adopting a new educational technology, is accessibility one of the “showstopper” issues considered? 
  4. “OTHER” –

    Challenges put forward by the participants in this Community of Practice.

Speakers
DC

Deborah Chen

Educational Developer (UBC)
avatar for Sue Doner

Sue Doner

Faculty, Instructional Designer, Camosun College
Instructional Designer: especially interested in Universal Design for Learning; Accessibility in online learning
avatar for Ruth Fraser

Ruth Fraser

Director Accessibility Services, KPU



Tuesday May 29, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Ballroom 3

2:05pm AKDT

The AIM Campaign: Getting Grades the Honest Way
What do Plagiarizing Panda and Resubmitting Racoon have to do with health? Research shows that stress can be a contributor to the growing levels of academic misconduct in postsecondary (Lynch, J., Everett, B., Ramjan, L., Calins, R., Glew, P. & Salamonson, Y., 2017; Wideman, M., 2011; Kisamore, J., Stone, T., Jawahar, I.M., 2007). At this university, a new campaign, AIM – Academic Integrity Matters, aligns common elements of misconduct with information, resources, and strategies - using humour - to increase awareness and understanding. And it is working. Students are paying attention. The purpose of the campaign is to engage students in integrity issues without inciting fear. It is to connect them to the information and to the Academic Success Centre where multiple levels of support are available including academic integrity mentors. In this session, participants will be introduced to the range of playful characters in the AIM campaign and how they are being used to support students’ learning. They will participate in some of the activities students complete as part of their learning – and yes – there’s a test (to be completed honestly!) 

Speakers
avatar for Maureen Wideman

Maureen Wideman

Associate Vice President, Teaching and Learning, University of the Fraser Valley
Maureen has spent more than 25 years in the teaching and learning field beginning as an instructional designer, faculty member, director and now AVP. She approaches faculty development as a student success initiative and maintains the learner-centred approach in all she does. Her... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Port of Hong Kong

2:50pm AKDT

Break
Snack: Sea Salt Popcorn

Beverages: Freshly Brewed Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee & Teas

Tuesday May 29, 2018 2:50pm - 3:15pm AKDT
2nd Floor Foyer

3:15pm AKDT

Rebuilding a Student Support Site through Community Engagement: An Amazing Journey!
What started as a project to rebuild the student support site in our learning management system (LMS) turned into an amazing journey of connecting with faculty and students around how they are using the LMS, and the innovation and creativity they engage in every day in their teaching and learning.

This session will both share some of the stories they told and how those stories are guiding (and inspiring) how we use our LMS to support students, and invite participants to share stories of their own experiences integrating LMS tools and other educational tools into their teaching.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Schudel

Emily Schudel

Instructional Designer, Camosun College
I am an Instructional Designer in the eLearning unit of the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. I have worked as an instructional designer for 20 years, and have worked with faculty enhancing their courses with technology, faculty teaching blended courses (combining face-to-face... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

3:15pm AKDT

Building Warmth in the Cold, Dark Quiet: The Promise and Challenge of Fostering a Pedagogy of Care in an Online Graduate Degree
In this session we will discuss the promises and challenges of modelling community caregiving in order to cultivate networked caretaking in an online graduate degree designed with openness and networked learning as cross cutting themes. We will examine the intersection between an institutional learning and teaching model, the values and principles inherent in the open community(ies), and the role of care in creation and use of digital learning environments. The ways and degree to which common values and principles are embedded in our processes and practices will be shared and “works in progress” discussed. This interactive discussion will share and provide examples from the perspective of program administration, Center for Teaching and Educational Technologies, Teamswork, Student Services, and faculty as we work collaboratively to model caregiving/taking for a future generation of leaders who design, create and implement digital learning environments.

After taking part in this session, it is expected that the audience will be better able to:
  • Discuss the role of caretaking and caregiving in an online graduate learning environment
  • Appreciate the tensions inherent in modelling the model of caregiving within the confines of higher education
  • Describe some examples of strategies for modelling caregiving and fostering caretaking at the graduate level in an online environment

Speakers
avatar for Jo Axe

Jo Axe

Professor, School of Education and Technology, Royal Roads University
Royal Roads University
avatar for Elizabeth Childs

Elizabeth Childs

Professor & Program Head, Royal Roads University (RRU)
At RRU we are designing a Masters program with openness, networked learning and digital mindset as core design principles.
avatar for George Veletsianos

George Veletsianos

Professor and Canada Research Chair, Royal Roads University
open and networked scholarship, online learning, social media, emerging pedagogies, student and faculty experiences in online settings


Tuesday May 29, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of Singapore

3:15pm AKDT

Communities of Praxis: Opening Education with Collective Community Action
Open working groups have a significant impact on supporting and developing the capacity of administration, libraries and faculties to adopt and adapt open resources and open educational practices at post-secondary institutions across British Columbia. These working groups, which often consist of a diverse range of roles and people, use an inclusive, cooperative, and collaborative approach to increase the capacity for open practices at their institution. This year, in cross-institutional collaboration with BCcampus, representatives from open working groups at UBC, Emily Carr, KPU, SFU, CapU, TRU, Douglas College, JIBC and BCIT have been working together to develop an open resource that supports open working groups.

Our panel will share ways best practices for organizing open working groups and ways in which such groups can support open education in post-secondary institutions. Using the Community of Praxis model to describe the reflection and action approach taken by these groups (Anderson and Freebody 2012), we will also share some of what has worked best in maintaining and sustaining open working groups, and what has not worked. Finally, we will share some of the open practices that we used in this project, such as open design, resource sprints and collaborative development.

For the facilitated discussion, participants will work together using 1-2-4-All to generate a Top 10 list of how we can support open education at our institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Michel Castagné

Michel Castagné

Digital Services Librarian, Capilano University
avatar for Caroline Daniels

Caroline Daniels

Systems Librarian, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
Ask me about how Librarian's can be part of the OER movement.
avatar for Krista Lambert

Krista Lambert

Designer: Learning or Instructional, Justice Institute of British Columbia
avatar for Hope Power

Hope Power

Teaching & Learning Librarian, Simon Fraser University
avatar for Lucas Wright

Lucas Wright

Open Strategist (Leave Appointment), BCcampus
UBC


Tuesday May 29, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 2

3:15pm AKDT

How to Ruin an Open Education Initiative at your Institution
Link: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-Pn6kXQ4xMxyR8dNjCJ-mUJcMygVGx9RDdiUk3nLQUA What does it take to ruin an open education initiative at your institution? How can you ensure that everything you have worked hard for fails and you end up supporting a closed system?

In this session, participants will actively engage in dissecting what it would take to ruin an open education movement at an institution. Facilitators will host an unconventional, interactive format that will have participants talking, brainstorming, and supporting each other as they discussion the challenges of open education at an institutional level.

Participants will have the opportunity to take these lessons learned from outlining how to ruin an open education initiative and then work in groups to flip the conversation to creating processes to work towards a successful open education initiative. This session is an opportunity for participants to critically reflect on the open education movement across BC and in particular at an institutional level.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Coolidge

Amanda Coolidge

Director, Open Education, Bccampus
Amanda Coolidge is the Director of Open Education at BCcampus. She leads the BC Open Textbook Project as well as the Open Education initiatives in the province of British Columbia, Canada. The BCcampus Open Education team produces Open Educational Resources (OER) – textbooks, toolkits... Read More →
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Associate Vice President, Teaching & Learning, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
avatar for Rosario Passos

Rosario Passos

Instructional Development Consultant, British Columbia Institute of Technology
Open pedagogy; integrating OER in existing curriculum and issues of quality in OER


Tuesday May 29, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of New York

3:15pm AKDT

Convening a New community of Practice: Reflection, Learning, and Mutuality.
Donald Schön (1971) developed several assumptions in his work ‘Beyond the Stable State’. The first assumption is framed in the title of his book – this is the assumption that institutions are in a process of continuous transformation. A second assumption is that our capacity to navigate transformation requires each of us to be able to learn and to also support the development and function of ‘learning systems’ (Schön, 1971, p. 30).

To thrive, our higher education institutions are facing immense learning challenges. For many of us, the pace of change and adjustment can feel like a sprint - and perhaps a sprint that we are only partially fit to complete. What could we achieve together in our institutions if we all cultivated our informal learning systems? For example, if we consider communities of practice (CoP), there are many different people in an our institutions who can initiate a community of practice to draw people together across the institution to learn, build community and share practice (Wenger, McDermott & Snyder, 2002). Over time, the community of practice members may develop a deep commitment to their fellow community members. Wenger (2000) refers to this deep sense of community as mutuality. Mutuality is a sense of shared engagement, trust and reciprocity developed within communities of practice (Wenger, 2000). Communities of practice support learning and they can also support care, trust and strong bonds.

The facilitators will share an account of their experience convening five gatherings for a new community of practice convened to support interdisciplinary learning for faculty with administrative roles in a university. Using microstructures from Liberating Structures (McCandless & Lipmanowicz, 2014) participants are invited to explore principles that support communities of practice, and to also consider how to nurture a rich dynamic of mutual care and support.

Learning Objectives:
  • Apply a conceptual framework for communities of practice 
  • Name one or two (or more) communities of practice domains in your institution.
  • Identify key principles that support learning and mutuality in a community of practice with a particular focus on convening the first few meetings.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Jennifer Walinga

Dr. Jennifer Walinga

Professor and Director, Royal Roads University
Dr. Jennifer Walinga is Director of the School of Communication and Culture at Royal Roads University. An experienced educator and former member of Canada’s Commonwealth, World and Olympic gold medal rowing teams (1983 to 1992), she draws on her personal experiences to frame the... Read More →
avatar for Rebecca Wilson-Mah

Rebecca Wilson-Mah

Assistant Professor, Royal Roads University
Hello!I am currently in the thesis stage of my EdD studies - with a focus on how interdisciplinary faculty members experience communities of practice (CoP). Let's talk about faculty engagement, social learning, and communities of practice!


Tuesday May 29, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of Hong Kong

3:15pm AKDT

Operationalizing care as an Educational Developer
As humans, we have an obligation to care for ourselves, for each other, and for the world, but how can we create, enter into, and support caring relationships in post-secondary institutions? Educational developers, like teachers, have an ethical responsibility for demonstrating care in our work to improve teaching and learning with ‘loving the learner’ being our motto (Rogers & Webb, 1991). As people working in different educational development roles (Curriculum Consultant, Educational Development Consultant) at a large research intensive post-secondary institution in BC who hold the values of caring, service, and relationships as a priority, we are exploring questions including: How do we operationalize care in our work? How is care operationalized in the types of questions that we ask in our work?

Building on the work of scholars who have explored an ethics of care in relation to education (see Noddings, 1988, Rogers & Webb, 1991), we provide some reflections on how an ethics of care is present in our own practices (and where it is absent or under-developed), in order to share how an ethics of care can be operationalized in educational development. Drawing on the literature, we also present practices that support enactment of an ethics of care in education and specifically in educational development. These include aspects such as modelling, dialogue, practice, continuity, reflection, and continuity (Rogers & Webb, 1991).

In this session, participants will be invited to explore how care is/could be operationalized in their work through discussing questions such as: What does care look like? Does showing care mean the same thing to everyone? Twenty years into the future, what might caring look like in post-secondary education?

This session is of interest to educational developers, staff, students, and administrators who have a desire to explore the ways that the principles of caring can be incorporated into practice. By the end of this session, participants will have been introduced to ways that care is (or could be) demonstrated in the field of educational development and they will be able to articulate several practices that support an ethics of care in post-secondary education.

Speakers
avatar for Marie Krbavac

Marie Krbavac

Educational Consultant, University of British Columbia
educational technology, instructional design, caring


Tuesday May 29, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of San Francisco

3:15pm AKDT

What the Yurt? Exploring 'Round' Teaching
What would it be like to teach in a yurt for a semester rather than a traditional classroom? This sharing session centers on one college’s ‘Pebble Project’, the idea that doing one thing different can have a ripple effect of change. Faculty from Coast Mountain College set out to explore ‘round’ teaching with a semester in the college’s yurt as their ‘one thing different’.

Faculty pursued scholarly inquiry in a community of practice, with 8 faculty participating together, representing biology, trades (automotive), geography, early childhood care and education, business, geoscience and English (adult basic education). These faculty all taught in the teaching lab yurt with the intention of answering the question of how space affects teaching and learning. As part of their efforts to answer this question, they documented their answers and gathered regularly to share insights with one another.

Come hear stories of how ‘built pedagogy’ contributed to teaching and learning and explore how you can play with space in your own classrooms. This session will address both process (‘round’ teaching) and meta-process (scholarly inquiry within a community of practice). Instructors and faculty developers will take away valuable learning from both and be provided with guided discussions on how this model of scholarly inquiry and professional development could be implementable in their own institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Adam Nash

Adam Nash

Learning Transformation Specialist, Northwest Community College
I come to the world of teaching and learning with creative and adventurous aims and ideas related to instruction, learning spaces, and technologies. I like working through instructional design, delivery, and assessment processes to help make them more experiential and place-based... Read More →


Tuesday May 29, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 3

4:00pm AKDT

Liberating Structures Meet-up (OPEN to all)
Join us for a slightly sped-up version of a typical user group meeting, hosted by the Vancouver Liberating Structures User group!
  • Networking (20 min)
  • Giving & Getting Help (20 min)
  • Learning Something New Together (20 min)
Link to Slides on Google

Sign-up sheet for future Virtual Liberating Structures sessions hosted by Vancouver and Victoria LS User Groups 

Speakers
avatar for Beth Cougler Blom

Beth Cougler Blom

Beth Cougler Blom
avatar for Barish Golland

Barish Golland

Operations Manager, Learning Technology Ecosystems, UBC Sauder School of Business, University of British Columbia
I get excited about finding ways to improve learning with technology that doesn't get in the way. I love using Liberating Structures to engage everyone in finding productive ways forward, enabling connection and idea flow. On the side I'm passionate about STEM in K-12 and volunteer... Read More →
avatar for Leva Lee

Leva Lee

Manager, BCcampus
In addition to the BCcampus Online Book Club (bccampusonlinebookclub.opened.ca) and ETUG History (etug.ca), feel free to ask me about stewarding communities of practice; the BCcampus Learning Access Program for Educators (LAP-E); the Scholarly Teaching and Ed Tech Fellows Programs... Read More →
avatar for Tracy Roberts

Tracy Roberts

Director, Learning & Teaching, BCcampus


Tuesday May 29, 2018 4:00pm - 5:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 3

4:15pm AKDT

Childcare Closes
Tuesday May 29, 2018 4:15pm - 4:30pm AKDT
- Room 440 (4th Floor)
 
Wednesday, May 30
 

7:00am AKDT

Registration Open
Wednesday May 30, 2018 7:00am - 7:30am AKDT
2nd Floor Foyer

7:30am AKDT

Hatha Yoga (30 min.)
Classic yoga postures (asanas) that move with your breath to help you reduce stress and increase strength and flexibility. These classes are approximately 50% stretching poses and 50% strengthening and toning poses, all combined with proper breathing and grounding techniques.

*All levels welcome
*Yoga mats provided or feel free to bring your own
*Wear your yoga gear or something comfortable to stretch in

Moderators
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Wednesday May 30, 2018 7:30am - 8:00am AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

7:30am AKDT

Breakfast
BREAKFAST BUFFET 

Steel Cut Oatmeal with Plump Raisins & Brown Sugar (V, GF, DF, VG)
Fruit & Fibre Muffins with Butter & Fruit Preserves (V)
Fresh Cut Seasonal Fruits, Melons, Berries
Hard Boiled Eggs

Beverages: 
Chilled Fresh Orange, Apple & Grapefruit Juice
Freshly Brewed Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee & Teas

Wednesday May 30, 2018 7:30am - 9:00am AKDT
Ballroom 1

8:00am AKDT

8:15am AKDT

Mini Yoga Break (15 min.)
  • Enjoy a 15 minute Mini Yoga Break (chair and standing Yoga). These are a great pick-me-up to help rejuvenate your mind and body.
  • Business attire is suitable for the class.
  • Relieves neck and shoulder tension, back pain and tight hips.
  • Transforms fatigue to alertness, stamina and greater productivity.
  • Boosts concentration to more effectively absorb the material being presented.

*All levels welcome!

Moderators
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Wednesday May 30, 2018 8:15am - 8:30am AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

8:30am AKDT

Childcare Opens
Wednesday May 30, 2018 8:30am - 9:00am AKDT
- Room 440 (4th Floor)

8:45am AKDT

Quiet Reflection & Meditation Drop-in
This is an open time/space for quiet reflection and/or meditation.

Festival attendees are invited to drop in for any length of time. 

We encourage people to "check their devices" at the door, but portable devices with headphones to support your meditation or other quiet reflective practices are permitted. 

Wednesday May 30, 2018 8:45am - 12:00pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

9:00am AKDT

Keynote: Monique Gray Smith
Livestream: https://zoom.us/j/953831912

Log in to the meeting link prior to the session to check the compatibility of your computer Please note that this Zoom conference will want you to download and fill out an attendee profile. This will you only need to do once for all future Zoom web conferencing. Note: No long distance is required, use your computer's audio.  
  
Keep your microphone on mute  It is preset to stay MUTED and if is turned on there is a chance that feedback will occur. 

Get comfortable, sit back and enjoy the live presentation If you miss the session don’t worry; we will post a video online for later viewing at your convenience.

Questions for the presenter
Please tweet to us using the hashtag #FoL18 and we will pass your questions along to the keynote.

Speakers
avatar for Monique Gray Smith

Monique Gray Smith

Little Drum Consulting
Monique Gray Smith is a mixed heritage woman of Cree, Lakota, and Scottish descent and is an award winning author, international speaker and consultant. Since 1996, Monique has been running Little Drum Consulting and her career has included positions as Executive Director for Aboriginal... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00am - 10:15am AKDT
Ballroom 1

9:00am AKDT

Senior Academic Administrators' Forum
Senior Academic Administrators' Forum Meeting 

Wednesday May 30, 2018 9:00am - 4:00pm AKDT
Tuscany Room

10:15am AKDT

Break
Snack: Granola & Berry Probiotic Yogurt Parfait (V, GF)

Beverages: Freshly Brewed Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee & Teas

Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:15am - 10:30am AKDT
2nd Floor Foyer

10:30am AKDT

Exploring the Experience of Educators Enacting Open Educational Practices
Awareness has now grown in terms of how open educational resources (OER) can impact educators and learners, the potential cost savings, and the impact on collaboration and sharing (Pitt, 2015; Weller, de los Arcos, Farrow, Pitt, & McAndrew, 2015). This is a significant shift that has impacted many students in positive ways, by ensuring broader access to educational resources for free and in flexible formats. Beyond replacing traditional forms of educational resources, there is a need to understand how access to OER impacts pedagogical practice. How are educators using these resources in ways which impact their pedagogical designs, especially now that the internet enables access to a wealth of information and knowledge ubiquitously? This question shifts the focus from popular discourses focusing on resources such as OER and open textbooks, to educational practices that are associated with open education (Deimann & Farrow, 2013).

Open educational practices (OEP) are those teaching and learning practices which use OER, as well as tools such as open-source or collaborative software, and implementation resources such as open licensing systems and open learning designs (Hodgkinson-Williams & Gray, 2009; Hylén & Schuller, 2007). Scholars have suggested OEP can impact the ways in which we design learning (Hood and Littlejohn, 2017; Paskevicius, 2017); support opportunities for increased personalization, autonomy, and self-regulation (Dohn, 2009; Ehlers, 2011); and position open education as a means to engaging our communities in an enhanced way (McGill, Falconer, Dempster, Littlejohn, & Beetham, 2013; Willinsky, 2014).

My Ph.D. research explores how educators are bringing elements of openness into their everyday teaching and learning practice within the structural confines of formal higher education. I draw upon structuration theory which explores the relationships between information communication technologies and the individuals who use them in their practice DeSanctis and Poole, 1994; Giddens, 1986; Orlikowski, 2000). Reporting on a phenomenological study with open educators, I'll share how they describe their experiences in relation to their teaching and community engagement.

In this session participants will have a chance to engage with the findings of this study and discuss ways of expanding open educational practices within their contexts. 

Speakers
avatar for Michael Paskevicius

Michael Paskevicius

University of Victoria
Michael Paskevicius is an Educational Developer in the Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning at Vancouver Island University and a Ph.D. candidate with the University of Victoria. His research focusses on open educational practices, emerging technologies, and knowledge management... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am AKDT
Port of Singapore

10:30am AKDT

Measuring the Institutional Impact of OER Initiatives in BC: Challenges and Preliminary Results
The adoption of open textbooks and other open educational resources (OER) affords pedagogical innovation and ensures equitable access to required course materials while yielding significant cost savings to students. In British Columbia, open textbook adoptions by over 400 faculty across 41 post-secondary institutions have yielded cost savings to students of over $5.5 million. Of course, this is only part of the estimated $227 million in cost savings to students worldwide by the end of the 2015-16 academic year (Creative Commons, 2015). Moreover, in addition to these significant cost savings, a review of 17 peer-reviewed studies of OER efficacy shows that in practically every instance, students assigned OER perform the same as or better than those assigned expensive commercial resources (Hilton & Mason, 2017), a result that has been replicated in British Columbia (e.g., Hendricks et al., 2017; Jhangiani et al., 2015).

However, beyond the economic and educational gains to students, questions remain concerning the institutional impact of OER adoption. Research at Tidewater Community College, for example, has shown that OER adoption in the context of their Z degree program enhances the course “throughput rate” (an aggregate of drop rates, withdrawal rates, and C or better rates; Hilton et al., 2016) which, together with increased course enrolments, results in gains in tuition revenue to the institution (Wiley et al., 2016). However, it remains to be seen whether OER adoption outside of an identified Z degree/Zed Cred program carries similar benefits and whether the findings at Tidewater can be replicated within a Canadian post-secondary context.

Over the 2017-18 academic year, the BCcampus Open Education Research and Advocacy fellows investigated this question, in partnership with the faculty and institutional research offices at Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU), Douglas College (DC), and the British Columbia Institute of Technology. In this presentation, the fellows will describe their approach, some of the challenges they encountered, and share some preliminary results from their analyses.

Speakers
avatar for Jenn Barker

Jenn Barker

Douglas College
avatar for Amanda Coolidge

Amanda Coolidge

Director, Open Education, Bccampus
Amanda Coolidge is the Director of Open Education at BCcampus. She leads the BC Open Textbook Project as well as the Open Education initiatives in the province of British Columbia, Canada. The BCcampus Open Education team produces Open Educational Resources (OER) – textbooks, toolkits... Read More →
avatar for Ken Jeffery

Ken Jeffery

Instructional Designer, Royal Roads University
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Associate Vice President, Teaching & Learning, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
avatar for George Veletsianos

George Veletsianos

Professor and Canada Research Chair, Royal Roads University
open and networked scholarship, online learning, social media, emerging pedagogies, student and faculty experiences in online settings


Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am AKDT
Ballroom 2

10:30am AKDT

Open Educational Resources Initiatives: From B. C. Institute of Technology, Canada to Linnaeus University, Sweden
Openness has a long genealogy in education and extending learning opportunities to a wider range of audiences has been an important aspect of educational practices (Edwards, 2015). In this presentation (approx. 45 min), we provide an overview of Open Education Resources (OER) initiatives in the Power Engineering Department at BCIT and describe how this rapidly evolving initiative enhance teaching and learning between BCIT and Linnaeus University (LU).

Jung, Bauer and Heaps (2017) found in their research that the lack of supplementary materials has been a significant issue for faculty. We faced the same challenge and following the BCIT OER initiatives, we worked together to design and test simulator labs (SIMLABs) as ancillary resources for Thermodynamics and Thermal Power Plant Simulator (TPPS) courses.

We tested the SIMLABs with both BCIT and LU students. According to Allen and Seaman (2016), most higher education faculty are unaware of OER however they are interested and some are willing to try. Not only were our tests excellent at increasing the OER awareness of LU faculty at Kalmar Maritime Academy, but the tests were also received positively by our students at home and abroad.

Coughlan and Perryman (2011) assert the emphasis in OER production has been on quantity rather than the ways in which OER might be used. In our presentation, we will share our current application of SIMLABs and how the use of SIMLABs could be expanded in other teaching contexts.

Many open practitioners characterize openness as not just a practice but an ethos, a commitment to democratic practices (Mackness, 2013; Neylon, 2013 as cited in Cronin, 2017). While this is the underlying motivation for us, we are also aware of the fact that teaching staff operate in an array of constraints. Several scholars suggest that institutional policy is a key enabling factor for academic staff to contribute their teaching materials as OER (Cox & Trotter, 2016). In our presentation, we will address these issues because we believe changing institutional culture to support OER can start small - whether it is a set of ancillary resources or an entire open textbook (SPARC, 2017).

Speakers
avatar for Serhat Beyenir

Serhat Beyenir

Instructor, Power Engineering, BCIT
I am an instructor at the Power Engineering Group of BCIT where I maintain web-based online courses and tutor distance education learners. I also teach in the Power and Process Engineering program. I am an open source software (OSS) advocate and open textbook proponent: I began using... Read More →
avatar for Sanja Boskovic

Sanja Boskovic

Associate Dean, BCIT - ATC
The Sustainable Engineer, I am not a typical engineer. Raised in Yugoslavia and educated in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Sarajevo, I was one of the few women practicing in engineering in my country. But that was just the beginning. I had an amazing journey through... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am AKDT
Port of Hong Kong

10:30am AKDT

Online Book Club Meet-up
We are interested in starting an online book club and invite you to contribute to it's design. 

Bring your ideas for an online book club and what it might look like... How do we make it engaging for our community; when in the academic year would be an optimal time to run it and over what duration of time? What elements would you be sure to include in the event/course/discussions? What technology would you recommend we use to support conversations, activity, practice?

To start, we propose the reading of the classic "How Learning Works" by Susan A. Ambrose, Michael W. Bridges, Michele DiPietro, Marsha C. Lovett, Marie K. Norman, Richard E. Mayer 

We also have a few possible models on how the online book club might be offered but we want to hear your ideas and feedback.

Hope you can join us!

Speakers
avatar for Peter Arthur

Peter Arthur

University of British Columbia Okanagan
avatar for Leva Lee

Leva Lee

Manager, BCcampus
In addition to the BCcampus Online Book Club (bccampusonlinebookclub.opened.ca) and ETUG History (etug.ca), feel free to ask me about stewarding communities of practice; the BCcampus Learning Access Program for Educators (LAP-E); the Scholarly Teaching and Ed Tech Fellows Programs... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:30am - 11:30am AKDT
Port of New York

10:30am AKDT

UBC Emerging Media Lab: An Incubation Space for Innovative Pedagogical Tools
This session will present the vision of UBC’s Emerging Media Lab (EML - eml.ubc.ca/) as a space dedicated to exploring how emerging technologies are evolving the way we learn. The presenters will share EML’s project development process and its support structure; how it established and continues to foster the connection with the industry, on-campus student groups, and k-12 teachers; how it built and has maintained a community of practice. Currently the EML serves two roles in the UBC community: 1) to enhance teaching and learning with immersive technologies - Virtual Reality (VR)/Augmented Reality (AR)/ Mixed Reality (MR) - while providing inspirational sessions such as demos, workshops, orientations and community of practice meetings, and 2) to incubate ideas by developing projects in collaboration among students, faculty and staff members.

Participants in the session will have opportunities to experience ongoing and completed projects in immersive media such as the HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, and HoloLens. Projects include the HoloBrain (http://eml.ubc.ca/projects/holobrain/), an AR teaching tool that could be implemented in neuroanatomy instruction, the Stanley Park Geography VR Field Trip (http://eml.ubc.ca/projects/geography-vr/ ), a project that focuses on Stanley park as a virtual reality experience using 3D spatial environment models, and landscape photogrammetry, and the Pterygopalatine Fossa VR project, ( http://eml.ubc.ca/projects/pterygopalatine-fossa-vr/ ) an interactive educational virtual reality tool to aid anatomy education with regards to the Pterygopalatine Fossa.
Participants will also be asked to create their own 3D objects as a demonstration of how guided task sheets can be used to aid faculty/staff/students in developing a better understanding of how immersive experiences are created. These projects will help participants to experience and better understand both the unique affordances of these technologies for teaching and learning and a better understanding of what is required in terms of development.

The session will end with a discussion of how emerging media can be used to support teaching and learning both in and out of the classroom in addition to what barriers and challenges are present.

Speakers
SD

Saeed Dyanatkar

Executive Producer, UBC Emerging Media Lab
With background in systems design, human factors, and emerging technologies, I have been working within academia on adopting emerging technologies to enhance knowledge translation and learning experience. Currently I lead UBC Studios and the UBC Emerging Media Lab (http://eml.ubc.ca... Read More →
avatar for Sharon Hu

Sharon Hu

Instructional Designer, Professional Development and Community Engagement, Faculty of Education, University of BC
Sharon is the Learning Design Strategist at UBC's Faculty of Education
KK

Kirk Karasin

360 video expert
JO

Juyeong Oh

UBC Emerging Media Lab
Engineering Student enthusiastic about VR/AR and its possibility. In progress of expanding my horizon beyond my degree at UBC. I've been working at UBC Emerging Media Lab for past 8 months as Lab Coordinator - Ask me anything about EML, developing for VR/AR and anything about students... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm AKDT
Port of San Francisco

10:30am AKDT

Designing Learning Environments that Enhance Student Well-being: Examples from Simon Fraser University and the University of British Columbia
Research is demonstrating that subtle shifts within higher education classroom contexts can create a profound impact on student well-being. This interactive workshop will share research, action, and innovations of two institutions who are creatively engaging faculty members to support and enhance student well-being.

This session will:
  • Provide an interactive and generative space for faculty members and staff to consider the impact of learning environments on student well-being in higher education.
  • Share innovative research and knowledge translation tools from two universities which can be adapted and used in other contexts, thus promoting consideration of future research in this area of inquiry.
  • Provide participants an opportunity to begin to consider approaches to promoting well-being in learning environments at their own institutions.

This workshop will be organized into the following sections:
  1. Participants will be asked to remember one of their best profs from their undergraduate experience and prompted to think about what made them a good professor. Participants will be asked to keep this in mind as the session proceeds as good teaching is inherently good for well-being. 
  2. Facilitators will share the research and theory that informs the well-being in learning environments projects. Facilitators will highlight the link between student well-being and academic success and share specific quantitative and qualitative data on students’ and faculty members’ perspectives on well-being in learning environments. 
  3. In small groups, participants will be invited to consider and discuss key themes emerging from the research.
  4. Facilitators will point to resources to help guide colleagues who wish to pursue adaptations of the well-being in learning environments projects at their campus. 

Speakers
RD

Rosie Dhaliwal

Health Promotion Specialist, Simon Fraser University
Rosie Dhaliwal, MEd, RD, is a Diversity & Inclusion and Education Specialist in Human Resources at Simon Fraser University (SFU). She has diverse experiences in nutrition and dietetics including roles as a Clinical Dietitian and Nutrition Consultant in the community, Distance Education... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 3

10:30am AKDT

“Grit” and Educators’ Burn Out: Using Graphic Narratives to Brainstorm Solutions to the “Sand in our Shoes”
"It isn’t the mountain ahead that wears you out; it is the grain of sand in your shoe."

It’s true we have mountains of worthy, exhilarating and challenging work in our education careers. Indeed, many of us are passionate about climbing those career mountains, conquering each exhausting climb to arrive at the summit of one educational mountain only to turn around and start a new climb all over again. But what happens when the small daily irritations — in or out of our learning environment — act like “sand” in our shoe and cause us to blister, limp or be miserable? How much of our energy goes into coping with the persistent “abrasions” from niggling troubles?

Sweating the small stuff. Perhaps we educators are playing in the same educational “sandbox” dealing with the same irritating “grains of sand”. This session is designed to help each other brainstorm about how we can get these “petty annoyances” out of our workday so we can reserve our energy for the essential mountain climbs ahead.

Give your “sandy” problems away. You will use a graphic narrative technique (e.g., stick figure comic) to illustrate: (a) one small daily irritation and (b) a best case outcome. Then you will hand off your problem to a team who will brainstorm possible strategies that could bring about your preferred outcome. That team will present two solutions back to you: humorous/hypothetical and doable/practical versions. This session will conclude with an opportunity to see how this exercise can be effectively used in the online learning environment. (The number of scenarios we can creatively solve will depend on the number of participants.)

Fun and practical. This is an opportunity for us to lighten the load in our work day by rehearsing through simple comic illustrations how we can remove persistent small annoyances that can wear us down.

Why limp along getting worn down by the “small stuff” that is, after all, fixable if you use some creative imagination and practical strategy? This fun graphic narrative technique can make it more joyful to “climb every mountain”.

(Bring your device.)

Speakers
avatar for Krista Lambert

Krista Lambert

Designer: Learning or Instructional, Justice Institute of British Columbia
avatar for Jessica Motherwell

Jessica Motherwell

Research Associate, Justice Institute of BC
Director, Education Consultant, Instructor, Tutoring servicesLife Outside the Box Learning InstituteCreating small comics to tell BIG stories Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice


Wednesday May 30, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

11:20am AKDT

Open to Health: Alone and Together – PART 1: How Healthy is Open Education?
There are many discussions about how best to sustain open educational resources. But what about the individuals who are creating, updating, and using these OER? How do they keep going? And where does the open education community, as whole, fit into this?

This presentation, the first of a two-part session, will examine the health of individuals within the open education movement and the community they comprise, and how the well-being of each influences the sustainability of both.

Lauri Aesoph, a naturopathic physician who specialized in natural healthcare education for 15 years, will integrate her experiences in holistic health with open education to present a model that that describes the health of open education. Together, with Josie Gray, she will highlight research that supports the connections between personal and public well-being and, from there, suggest the elements within the open education community that shape both the group’s and its individual member’s viability in this movement. Time will be allotted for audience input and questions.

Those interested in exploring an individualized holistic health blueprint may attend Part 2 of this session, the 90-minute workshop: Explore and Develop a Personal Plan.

Note: To participate in interactive questions during the presentation, bring your mobile device and before the presentation download the TurningPoint app from iTunes or Google Play.

Speakers
avatar for Lauri Aesoph

Lauri Aesoph

Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
Lauri supports the development and sharing of open educational resources in British Columbia. She has project managed and led workshops and webinars on the adoption, adaptation, and creation of open educational resources. She also provides technical and instructional design support... Read More →
avatar for Josie Gray

Josie Gray

Coordinator of Collection Quality, BCcampus
Josie is the Coordinator of Collection Quality at BCcampus. She manages the B.C. Open Textbook Collection and provides training and support for B.C. faculty publishing open textbooks in Pressbooks. Josie has been learning about and teaching accessibility best practices in the context... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 11:20am - 12:05pm AKDT
Port of Hong Kong

11:20am AKDT

They are Coming! A New Generation of Learners from BC’s K-12 Curriculum Redesign: Considering Enhanced Assessment and Flexible Learning Experiences in PSE
British Columbia is undertaking a significant reform of its Kindergarten to Grade 12 curriculum, assessment, competencies and graduation requirements. With the K- 9 curriculum already underway, the Grade 10 curriculum is being implemented in July 2018 and the new Grade 11 and 12 curricula will be finalized this year and mandated as of July 2019. With these changes, post-secondary institutions could see incoming BC high school graduates, who have been learning with the new curricula, around 2020.

Are BC’s colleges, institutes and universities ready for these students? Are institutions with supports in place to provide an effective transition between high school and post-secondary learning to make the learning as seamless as possible? Are all aware of the BC K-12 changes and how they can support the new learning experiences of students?

This session will explore the new opportunities for post-secondary institutions to build collaborations and connections for a successful K-20 student learning journey specifically looking at the design of flexible learning experiences and enhancing assessment practices. The session will engage participants in considering strategies, activities and ideas for post-secondary educators, administrators and support staff to approach the process of responding to and acting upon the new competencies, skills and knowledge students will have upon graduation.

The session will include an overview of the core K-12 curriculum changes as well as discussion of activity in supporting the K-20 learning journey happening across the province.

In sum, participants will achieve three outcomes: engage in a more in-depth exploration of the core K-12 curriculum changes, explain some strategies for moving forward with enhancements to teaching and learning experiences in post-secondary institutions and describe collaborations going on around BC.

BC’s new K-12 curriculum is a game changer for post-secondary. Students, K-12 educators, PSE instructors, support staff – everyone is welcome to explore this topic!

Speakers
avatar for Liesel Knaack

Liesel Knaack

Director, Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning, Vancouver Island University
Liesel is the director of the Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning at VIU. The centre supports faculty and students with learning technologies, pedagogical design, online learning and scholarly teaching and learning. Liesel was formerly a K-12 teacher and Associate Professor... Read More →



Wednesday May 30, 2018 11:20am - 12:05pm AKDT
Ballroom 2

11:30am AKDT

Zed Cred Project
This is a private meeting for invited BCcampus Zed Cred grantees from TRU, KPU and JIBC. 

Speakers
avatar for Krista Lambert

Krista Lambert

Designer: Learning or Instructional, Justice Institute of British Columbia


Wednesday May 30, 2018 11:30am - 1:30pm AKDT
Port of Shanghai (Boardroom)

12:00pm AKDT

BCOEL Meeting
Speakers
avatar for Brenda Smith

Brenda Smith

Open Education Librarian, Thompson Rivers University
Brenda Smith is the Open Education Librarian at TRU. She is a recipient of a BCcampus Award for Excellence in Open Education. She has been supporting open education by conducting workshops and webinars, helping faculty to identify existing OER, and co-facilitating open textbook s... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 12:00pm - 1:00pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

12:05pm AKDT

Lunch
MOLE HILL LOCAL FARMERS MARKET 
Artisan Breads, Rolls & Butter
ALL VEGAN/VEGETARIAN PASTA entrée
Hand Select Fraser Valley Greens
Goddess Dressing & Balsamic Vinaigrette
BC Hot House Grilled Vegetables & Balsamic
Olive Oil & Sea Salt
Cured Genoa & Black Pepper Salami
Marinated Rossdale Farms Chicken Breast
Local & Artisan Island Brie Cheese, Aged White Cheddar & Blue Vein Cheese
 
Beverages:
  • Chocolate Milk & Lemonade
  • Freshly Brewed Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee & Teas 

Dessert: Vegan Pecan Torte

Wednesday May 30, 2018 12:05pm - 1:15pm AKDT
Ballroom 1

12:15pm AKDT

Mini Yoga Session (15 min)
  • Enjoy a 15 minute Mini Yoga Break (chair and standing Yoga). These are a great pick-me-up to help rejuvenate your mind and body.
  • Business attire is suitable for the class.
  • Relieves neck and shoulder tension, back pain and tight hips.
  • Transforms fatigue to alertness, stamina and greater productivity.
  • Boosts concentration to more effectively absorb the material being presented.

*All levels welcome!

Moderators
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Wednesday May 30, 2018 12:15pm - 12:30pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

12:30pm AKDT

12:45pm AKDT

Mini Yoga Break (15 min)
  • Enjoy a 15 minute Mini Yoga Break (chair and standing Yoga). These are a great pick-me-up to help rejuvenate your mind and body.
  • Business attire is suitable for the class.
  • Relieves neck and shoulder tension, back pain and tight hips.
  • Transforms fatigue to alertness, stamina and greater productivity.
  • Boosts concentration to more effectively absorb the material being presented.

*All levels welcome!

Speakers
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga


Wednesday May 30, 2018 12:45pm - 1:00pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

1:15pm AKDT

Kids Yoga
Time for a little stretch for our youngest conference attendees. Classes adapted to this age group and will be lead by the Festival's certified yoga instructor.

Speakers
VC

Vancouver Corporate Yoga

Vancouver Corporate Yoga


Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:15pm - 1:45pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

1:15pm AKDT

A Flexible New Teaching Technology for Facilitating Peer Evaluation in a Safe Environment: The ComPAIR Project at UBC
Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptops to this session

This presentation introduces ComPAIR, an innovative peer feedback and teaching technology developed at UBC that provides students a safe, flexible environment to develop the skill of evaluating another person’s work, and in turn, receive evaluations from their peers.

Particularly in introductory courses, the effectiveness of peer feedback can be limited by the relative newness of students to both the course content and the skills involved in providing good feedback. ComPAIR’s novel design makes use of students’ inherent ability and desire to compare: according to the psychological principle of comparative judgement, novices are much better at choosing the “better” of two answers than they are at giving those answers an absolute score. By scaffolding peer feedback through comparisons, ComPAIR provides an engaging, simple, and safe environment that supports two distinct outcomes: 1) students learn how to assess their own work and that of others in a way that 2) facilitates the learning of subtle aspects of course content through the act of comparing.

We will review the results of an extended assessment of student experience with ComPAIR through three pilot courses in English, Physics and Math at UBC. Session Participants will have the opportunity to actually use the software from the perspective of an instructor, course administrator, and student. There will also be an interactive portion of the session to demonstrate how comparisons are used for learning.

ComPAIR is open source software developed at UBC. Details on how to set up compare at your own institution can be found here: https://lthub.ubc.ca/guides/compair/.

Speakers
avatar for James Charbonneau

James Charbonneau

Assistant Professor of Teaching, University of British Columbia
I'm an Instructor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at UBC and the Associate Director the Science Gateway Programs, which includes Science One and the Coordinated Science Program. I spend most of my time either teaching or thinking about teaching.


Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm AKDT
Port of San Francisco

1:15pm AKDT

Collaborative Approach to OER Policy and Guidelines Development in the Commonwealth: The Case of Botswana, Cameroon and Sri Lanka.
Access to relevant learning resources is an important aspect in ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education and lifelong learning opportunities for all as outlined in SDG4. The Commonwealth of Learning (COL) has identified the development of OER as a potential answer to these challenges. A total of 29 provincial OER policies and guidelines were drafted in Sri Lanka, Botswana and Cameroon closely involving the provincial policy makers for school education. This session aims to share how this bottom-up approach was used to ensure wider advocacy for OER and the increased uptake/ownership from a larger number of policy makers/implementers spread throughout these developing countries.

The session will highlight provincial OER policy development activities in Sri Lanka, Botswana and Cameroon. The champions in each country will share their experiences in advocacy, sensitization and development of draft OER policies/guidelines for the school education system in their respective countries. I will use pre-recorded video clips of 5 minutes each for the champions to share their experiences. They will highlight the challenges faced in approaching the most rural of regions in their respective countries to advocate the use of OER for schools as a potential solution for the lack of textbooks. I will be speaking for approximately 15 minutes providing introductions, sharing resources and concluding. A 15 minute Q&A session will be required. Overall, the session will be 45 minutes.

More information regarding the activities can be found at http://oasis.col.org/handle/11599/2386 , http://oasis.col.org/handle/11599/2437 and http://oasis.col.org/handle/11599/2672

Speakers
avatar for Ishan Abeywardena

Ishan Abeywardena

Adviser: Open Educational Resources, Commonwealth of Learning
A computer scientist by training, I have keen research interests in the technological aspects of OER, eLearning, MOOC and ODL. My technical interests include sentiment analysis, text mining, software development and mobile application development. Currently, I’m in the field of... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:15pm - 2:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 3

1:15pm AKDT

Open to Health: Alone and Together – PART 2: Explore and Develop a Personal Plan
The Canadian Institutes of Health Research has recognized the importance between work and well-being with its Healthy and Productive Work initiative. However, in a knowledge-driven field, such as open education where information and work affected by information are continuously changing, staying well is a challenge.

In this follow up interactive session to PART 1: How Healthy Is Open Education, participants will explore how the four aspects of personal health – body, mind, heart, and spirit – affect both individual well-being and the health of the open education community. This concepts of personal and public holistic health will be guiding principles as each participant develops a plan.

Participants will be provided with a personal health plan to fill out during the workshop. This individualized work will be followed by small and large group discussions and sharing.

Speakers
avatar for Lauri Aesoph

Lauri Aesoph

Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
Lauri supports the development and sharing of open educational resources in British Columbia. She has project managed and led workshops and webinars on the adoption, adaptation, and creation of open educational resources. She also provides technical and instructional design support... Read More →
avatar for Josie Gray

Josie Gray

Coordinator of Collection Quality, BCcampus
Josie is the Coordinator of Collection Quality at BCcampus. She manages the B.C. Open Textbook Collection and provides training and support for B.C. faculty publishing open textbooks in Pressbooks. Josie has been learning about and teaching accessibility best practices in the context... Read More →



Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:15pm - 2:45pm AKDT
Port of Hong Kong

1:15pm AKDT

Venturing Beyond the Walled Garden: Building Online Learning Activities Outside of the Learning Management System that Allow for Flexible, Adaptable and Meaningful Learning.
If we want to motivate and engage students to learn in ways that will be longer-lasting and more meaningful to them, we need to design rich learning experiences that facilitate this through flexible and adaptable activities and assignments. Learning management systems (aka walled gardens) provide teachers and learners a safe and controlled space for threaded discussions, storing grades, uploading assignments, posting content, communicating notices, and deploying some constructed assessment components like quizzes.

However, learning management environments are limited in their abilities to engage students in deep learning and meaningful educational activities. To do so, requires instructors to move beyond the walled garden into a less organized and less controlled digital world.

In this session, we will outline supportive teaching strategies and learning activities (facilitated by the digital environment) that promote higher levels of engagement for learning – and are accessible and relatively easy to implement using open practices and resources.

This learning happens outside the walled garden and requires careful consideration and attention to care for the students and the learning they will embark upon. But where to start? There are so many options, tools, apps, platforms and parameters to consider when designing a more open and flexible learning experience.

Using a collection of evidence-based principles of learning, we’ll outline how designing rich online learning experiences may be easier than you think.

Participants will be exposed to 7 key learning principles and appropriate tools to use within and outside of learning systems. We'll share some of our favourite examples of aligned assignments and activities.

We'll engage youin a discussion of other examples that might fit within the principles, gather ideas and share back with everyone. Come prepared to share your best examples of online learning outside the walled garden - learning out in the open!

Speakers
avatar for Liesel Knaack

Liesel Knaack

Director, Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning, Vancouver Island University
Liesel is the director of the Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning at VIU. The centre supports faculty and students with learning technologies, pedagogical design, online learning and scholarly teaching and learning. Liesel was formerly a K-12 teacher and Associate Professor... Read More →
avatar for Michael Paskevicius

Michael Paskevicius

University of Victoria
Michael Paskevicius is an Educational Developer in the Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning at Vancouver Island University and a Ph.D. candidate with the University of Victoria. His research focusses on open educational practices, emerging technologies, and knowledge management... Read More →



Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:15pm - 2:45pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

1:15pm AKDT

Holistic Personal Development for Meaningful Engagement
Personal development is one of the best ways to protect health and promote wellbeing. It is also one of the essential ingredients for developing the ability to cultivate deep relational engagement with other people. Holistic personal development refers to optimal, integrated development of one’s body, mind, heart or emotions, spirit and professional development.

Although in essence, we are whole beings, it is useful to describe holistic personal development by categorizing the different aspects of ourselves into physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, and professional dimensions. Each aspect relates to important needs or states that we must achieve to be holistically developed and well. The integration of all aspects forms a cohesive whole that serves people well in sustaining a healthy and happy life and effective professional practice.

I wish to present this learning activity in an interactive way, encouraging attendees to participate in the five-part self-assessment and action planning for holistic personal development. It supports the notion that well-rounded, holistic personal development is foundational to taking action in the world, and having a meaningful effect on interactions, relationships, networking, and professional development.

In this session, students and faculty can engage in reflection and action planning to shape a holistic plan that fits their life-style. They will explore the use of mobile apps and the role of mindfulness to support this development. This is based on a learning activity that nursing students do to better understand their place in the world and how they can develop themselves and have an impact in their chosen profession. 

Speakers
avatar for June Kaminski

June Kaminski

Curriculum Coordinator, Faculty, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
June Kaminski graduated from the University of British Columbia (UBC) with Baccalaureate and Master’s degrees in Nursing and is currently completing a PhD in Curriculum Studies in the UBC Department of Education. She is the current Past President, Treasurer, and Webmaster for the... Read More →



Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:15pm - 2:45pm AKDT
Ballroom 2

1:15pm AKDT

Stacking the Deck: A Visual Toolkit for Instructor Self-Care
In this studio style session, participants will collaboratively design, draw and assemble a shared toolkit in the form of a deck of cards reflecting on aspects of instructor self-care (or lack thereof) in their learning and teaching practices.

“Put on your own oxygen mask before helping others”. How can educators take care of their students, if educators do not first take care of themselves? This activity is designed to help educators discover and prioritize their self-care needs. In this increasingly complex world, staying mindful of personal and professional priorities comes with challenges that we educators share. Indeed, some of these self-care challenges may be universal issues across disciplines.

Iconographies attempt to convey meanings that are universal in human experience. Whether it’s a sports brands’ swoosh, an emoji in your text message or to gender identify public washrooms, we engage with these sorts of ‘visual shorthand’ daily. We use them to convey complex information to each other, and we are well equipped to use such iconography in our own daily practices at work, in the office or classroom.

Card decks are a popular product for facilitating learning through storytelling and play. (Eg. Group Works deck, Dixit Cards, Tarot cards etc) Most card decks allow users a multitude of affordances from the “drawing a card”, to more complex and customizable interactions. In this way they are ideal for guided reflections.

Jason Toal, M.A. and Jessica Motherwell McFarlane, Ph.D. will facilitate a generative card building process using the graphic or icon ‘jam’ as the underlying activity. Participants will first have the opportunity to visually explore some universal themes they experience when taking care in and out of the classroom. Each participant will be invited to volunteer one or more cards to our collected self-care iconography deck which then will be uploaded online and offered as an open resource.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Motherwell

Jessica Motherwell

Research Associate, Justice Institute of BC
Director, Education Consultant, Instructor, Tutoring servicesLife Outside the Box Learning InstituteCreating small comics to tell BIG stories Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice
avatar for Jason Toal

Jason Toal

Interaction Specialist, Simon Fraser University
@draggin on twitterJason brings a background in art, design, and education to the practice of Interaction Specialist. His focus is on the needs of users in whatever end product they may be using in their learning experience, from new web technologies, innovative media to drawing on... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:15pm - 2:45pm AKDT
Ballroom 1

1:50pm AKDT

Quiet Reflection & Meditation Drop-in
This is an open time/space for quiet reflection and/or meditation.

Festival attendees are invited to drop in for any length of time. 

We encourage people to "check their devices" at the door, but portable devices with headphones to support your meditation or other quiet reflective practices are permitted. 

Wednesday May 30, 2018 1:50pm - 3:30pm AKDT
Port of Macau (Reflection Room)

2:05pm AKDT

Connected Learning in Action
How can students create a personalized learning pathway and build competencies that would help them gain access to real-world opportunities? How can these students be supported and be connected with peers, mentors, experts in the field, and community interest groups? How can educational technologies be leveraged to build this web of personalized learning pathways and relationships that support learning beyond the formal educational structure?

These are key issues in connected learning and are addressed in this presentation on a connected learning project called “Sky, Water, Earth” (http://www.skywaterearth.ca). "Sky, Water, Earth" is a collection of self-guided learning activities that are grouped by theme and presented in a playlist format, or a sequenced pathway. The themes are competencies valued by future employers in the sciences – scientific communication, creative thinking, and research orientation. These themes are closely aligned with the BC Science Learning Standards. Students choose which playlists to work on, progress at their own pace, earn points as they complete the playlists, and redeem points for real-world opportunities. Some real-world opportunities include Google hangout with scientists, access to networking events, and guided visits to labs at UBC. The presenter will share the project design and development process, contribution of project partners, and initial feedback from educators. The presenter will also lead group discussions on how elements of connected learning (self-selected learning pathways, flexible pace, and community connection) could be incorporated in their own teaching and how to overcome some potential challenges.

Speakers
avatar for Sharon Hu

Sharon Hu

Instructional Designer, Professional Development and Community Engagement, Faculty of Education, University of BC
Sharon is the Learning Design Strategist at UBC's Faculty of Education


Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Port of San Francisco

2:05pm AKDT

Everyone Wants A's: Accessibility, Affordability and Adaptability
Open educational resources (OER) offer a refreshing and powerful opportunity for all education systems. The movement is maturing, but much remains to be understood and implemented in order to promote a wider adoption by the community and produce a greater impact on the educational system at all levels.

In this session, we propose to advance and debate some possible directions to the movement, specifically in large enrolment courses at the higher education level where the potential impact of OER is immense.

We propose to address accessibility, affordability and adaptability, and if time permits also sustainability. In particular:
  • What are the higher education resources issues and what can be the role of OER?
  • Who are these instructors? What do they need (content, technology and support)?
  • Who are these students? What do they need (content, technology and support)?
  • Can we do all this in a sustainable manner?
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1kiZvHqvo8oNfTdUItpho2nAhcbjN-qL8ONmcL2XjFo4/edit?ts=5b0dee1f

Speakers
SK

Stephanie Keyowski

Editor, Open Educational Resources, Lyryx Learning Inc.
avatar for Claude Laflamme

Claude Laflamme

Professor & President, University of Calgary and Lyryx Learning
Professor of Mathematics at the University of Calgary, and President of Lyryx Learning. I have been involved in educational software development projects to support students for many years, from which Lyryx was eventually born. Initially created solely to develop (formative) online... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Port of New York

2:05pm AKDT

Supporting UNESCO Sustainable Development Goal 4: Quality Education Challenges and Opportunities with OER
Open Educational Resources (OER) and their offspring, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), are becoming important factors in achieving the Sustainable Development Goal 4: Quality Education (SDG4). This was recognised early on by UNESCO in 2004 when they first coined the term "Open Educational Resources" and in 2012 with the OER Paris Declaration. UNESCO is continuing its support of OER with the 2nd OER Summit in September 2017. There is recognition that OER and MOOCs, while not being the solution to the world's educational crises, will play an important, if not essential, role. The OER movement is less than 15 years old and is growing rapidly as more and more nations and institutions adopt the view that publicly-funded research and educational content belongs to the people and should therefore be open and accessible to them. Canada can play an important role in supporting SDG4 by increasing its support for OER and open education in general, both in Canada and abroad.

Speakers
RM

Rory McGreal

Professor, Athabasca University
I am the UNESCO/Commonwealth of Learning/International Council for Open and Distance Education Chair in Open Educational Resources and the director of TEKRI at Athabasca University


Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Ballroom 3

2:05pm AKDT

Who Cares — Helping Young People Develop Empathy
Recent studies have shown that there has been a decline in empathy in young adults over the last 10 years.

In this workshop we will discuss the implications of this research and demonstrate some techniques that will help college students or employees to develop more empathy.
Empathy is an important part of emotional intelligence that can be developed in most people. Researchers have found that a person’s Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is four times as likely to predict their success in life than their IQ.

You will take part in group discussions, watch short video demonstrations and participate in group activities that will help you develop your skills in assisting your students to increase their empathy.

Let’s make the world kind again!

Speakers

Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:05pm - 2:50pm AKDT
Port of Singapore

2:50pm AKDT

Break
Snack: Home Style Granola Bars (V, GF)

Beverages: Freshly Brewed Coffee, Decaffeinated Coffee & Teas

Wednesday May 30, 2018 2:50pm - 3:15pm AKDT
2nd Floor Foyer

3:15pm AKDT

YouTube for Higher Education: A Discussion-Based Approach for Promoting Growth
It has been the experience of the presenters that mindful use of social media can make learning feel fun. While YouTube is not new to education, ongoing evaluation of new ways to use it and improve it’s effectiveness enables more effective sharing of ideas and educational resources. YouTube can target the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains of Bloom’s taxonomy while remaining highly accessible on handheld devices (May, Wedgeworth, & Bigham, 2013). Multiple authors discuss the need to be cautious when selecting videos for learning to ensure they are accurate and help students meet course objectives (Agazio, & Buckley, 2009; Jaffar, 2012; May et al., 2013). It is often difficult to find a video that meets all the needs of learners in a particular course. For these reasons, Jaffar (2012) suggests that creation of videos by faculty is the optimal strategy for promoting effective student learning. With open licensing, there is potential to facilitate the creation of remixed videos that target the specific needs of learners. What are the benefits to sharing videos on YouTube, and are the default licensing options enough?

The presenters invite discussion of best practices around YouTube video creation, discussion of the challenges to open licensing in this space and the potential for video use in education. Sharing of these experiences will help other educators consider if and how they may use YouTube. As an Open Educational Media practitioners, we can share examples of faculty attempts at using video lessons on YouTube and other platforms. What choices do they make and how do they impact reuse?

Speakers
avatar for Jon Fulton

Jon Fulton

Video Producer, Thompson Rivers University
Jon is a video producer for Thompson Rivers University, Open Learning. He creates pedagogically-driven media pieces for distance courses. His business card should read "Image Acquisition and Manipulation," although he also has extensive experience in audio manipulation, once creating... Read More →
avatar for Laura Killam

Laura Killam

Professor, Cambrian College
Laura is a nurse educator who is committed to student empowerment through inclusive and flexible approaches to learning. Over the past year, her scholarship has been focused on ways to integrate authentic assessments like open-book testing and simulation as learning opportunities... Read More →
avatar for Jason Toal

Jason Toal

Interaction Specialist, Simon Fraser University
@draggin on twitterJason brings a background in art, design, and education to the practice of Interaction Specialist. His focus is on the needs of users in whatever end product they may be using in their learning experience, from new web technologies, innovative media to drawing on... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of Vancouver

3:15pm AKDT

The Balancing Act of Collaboration, Openness, Quality and Ensuring Impact in the Creation of OER Copyright Resources
This presentation examines the tensions in developing a large scale, institutional OER project and the care that must be undertaken in a project with a diverse range of team members, stakeholders and learners. The University of Alberta’s (U of A) Copyright OER project, funded through a Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL) Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund grant, aims to develop a series of OER tutorials for use in graduate courses within the Faculty of Education and to be available for adoption and adaptation beyond the U of A.

The project has numerous stakeholders including the Copyright Office, Centre for Teaching and Learning, U of A Libraries, Technologies in Education and the School of Library and Information Studies, which presents logistical challenges in coordinating meetings and resources. More importantly the size and scope of the project results in tension between the design quality and the openness of the tutorials, as the team aims to create high quality, interactive resources without the use of proprietary software (e.g. Articulate or Captivate).
As a result a complicated range of software has been combined to ensure openness, discoverability, interactivity and preservation. A second major tension focuses on creating tutorials including learning objectives and assessments suitable for graduate students to use in the context of specific courses, a more general academic audience, and to ensure the materials could even be of use to the general public. Finally, a third tension centers on how to develop the resources as an institutional project and maintain the degree of control necessary to design the tutorials and prioritize the content covered within each tutorial, while also engaging the broader community, specifically of copyright officers and librarians in Canada, to enhance the quality of resources and reduce duplication of effort among institutions. The presentation will examine the decision made to carefully balance these tensions and competing interests and priorities with the goal of informing the audience how to navigate such decisions in other large scale, institutional OER projects, particularly ones that are not course/subject matter specific.

Speakers
MB

Michelle Brailey

Librarian, University of Alberta Library
Michelle supports institution-wide program development, awareness, and sustainability of OER. As an open education advocate, she contributes to the open education movement locally and globally through initiatives advocating for open educational resources, open data, and open acce... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of Singapore

3:15pm AKDT

We've Led the Horses to Water... Now What? Student Perceptions, Use, and Impact of Open Textbooks at Douglas College
A short 45-min session to present our data from Douglas College students about student attitudes towards OER.

Our session will compare and contrast student's attitudes in first year physics, astronomy and biology classes to open textbooks. We will also relate attitudes towards OER to simple demographic information and the overall cost of textbooks to determine whether there are indicators that can be measured a priori to suggest that students in a particular course may be more or less receptive to the incorporation of OER.

We would further like to discuss with other researchers the procedures, promise, pitfalls, and possibility of conducting further replications at multiple institutions across BC. Finally, we would like to discuss what our data suggest about the utility and ease of encouraging widespread adoption of OER in BC.

Speakers
avatar for Jenn Barker

Jenn Barker

Douglas College
avatar for Jennifer Kirkey

Jennifer Kirkey

Instructor, Douglas College
I have been teaching physics and astronomy for more than 30 years at the community college level. I do science outreach to elementary schools. I became an advocate for open textbooks about five years ago and am currently working on a project to make open physics and engineering problems... Read More →



Wednesday May 30, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 3

3:15pm AKDT

What do Open Textbooks Really Mean to Students that Have to Use Them?
Since 2011, JIBC has implemented open textbooks in some courses, including adoptions, adaptions, and new textbook creations. One of the drivers for this activity is a recognition that our student demographic is lower socio-economic for the most part and likely face considerable challenges in paying for their programs. Currently, we are working towards creating one of the first Zed Creds in Canada in our Law Enforcement Studies Diploma program. We have 11 textbooks currently in use and expect all courses in the LESD program to have zero cost for textbooks by Fall 2020. In 2018, we are seeking student perspectives on the impact that this has had on their perception of JIBC, their program, and their courses and instructors. Specifically, we want to know whether our assumption that open textbooks are benefitting students is valid, and if so, in what ways and to what degree.

In this presentation, we’ll share findings and discuss possible next steps both in terms of research and future development of our Zed Cred.

Speakers
avatar for Florence Daddey

Florence Daddey

Centre for Teaching, Learning and Innovation, Justice Institute of BC
Florence is a Program Manager and Instructor and works for the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Innovation (CTLI) at the Justice Institute of BC. In her role as an instructional designer she collaborates with program areas and divisions as they develop and redesign their courses... Read More →
avatar for Krista Lambert

Krista Lambert

Designer: Learning or Instructional, Justice Institute of British Columbia


Wednesday May 30, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of San Francisco

3:15pm AKDT

Building Capacity for Diversity and Inclusion in Higher Ed - A Teaching & Learning Centre’s Perspective
During student-led UBC Commerce Undergraduate Society FROSH in September 2013, chants promoting rape culture and Aboriginal stereotypes occurred. In October 2013, then UBC President Stephen Toope established the Task Force on Intersectional Gender-Based Violence and Aboriginal Stereotypes (IGBVAS) in order to develop a set of actionable recommendations that would result in transformative and robust changes to campus culture.

In 2014, in response to the recommendations made by the IGBVAS Task Force, the Provost developed action plans to reiterate UBC’s commitment to equity and diversity.

Based on the Provost’s action plans, the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology (CTLT) created an internal Equity and Diversity Working Group (EDWG) with a one-year mandate that was later extended to two years and has now transitioned into a standing committee.

This 45-minute interactive presentation will showcase the work of how the Equity and Diversity Standing Committee (EDSC), formerly known as the (EDWG), came to be a unit-wide initiative and the processes in which the EDSC transitioned into a standing committee. Participants will engage in dialogue and strategize on ways to build capacity within their own units on issues related to campus climate. Participants will share experiences and strategies for how to meaningfully engage campus community members in difficult conversations.

Speakers
avatar for kele fleming

kele fleming

Associate Director, CTLT, UBC-V
AH

Alicia Harder

Senior Manager, Planning and Operations, CTLT, UBC



Wednesday May 30, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 1

3:15pm AKDT

Measuring Interdisciplinary Thinking in a Unique Teaching Environment: The Science One Program at UBC
Science One, a unique alternative to the standard first year in the Faculty of Science at UBC, is a 29-credit program of study spanning two terms that provides 75 students an opportunity to immerse themselves in science. The program, led by 8 professors, presents the traditional science disciplines (biology, chemistry, math, and physics) in a unified, interdisciplinary format that cultivates critical, independent thought as the basis of scientific inquiry.

The program is built around a community of learners. Students create lifelong connections with friends and professors and dedicated classrooms and study spaces, as well as unparalleled access to instructors. Data show that Science One alumni out perform in traditionally challenging second and third year courses, even when accounting for incoming high school grades.

However, one of the key goals of any interdisciplinary program is to break down the siloed thinking that confines ideas to specific disciplines. While there is increasing interest in interdisciplinary science programs, there is a lack of documented research in interdisciplinary teaching and learning. Our work has been guided by two fundamental research questions:

1. Do students in an interdisciplinary program “think differently” than students in a multidisciplinary program?

2. Are students in an interdisciplinary program more readily able to transfer knowledge across disciplinary boundaries than those is a multidisciplinary program? If so, can we measure it?

Previously, card sorting has been used to distinguish expert and novice thinking in physics (Chi, 1981), biology (Smith, 2013) and chemistry (Krieter, 2016). We have extended this method to develop a card sorting instrument that measures interdisciplinary thinking. Students are asked to sort nine disciplinary textbook problems (3 each from biology, chemistry and physics). There are two hypothesized sorts: a disciplinary sort and an interdisciplinary sort.

During our session, we will show that participating in an interdisciplinary science program like Science One can break down these siloes. We will also discuss how card sort activities are a versatile method for measuring student knowledge categorization in many situations. To set the stage, participants will take part in a card sort to get a feeling for how hypothesized sorts can manifest themselves.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Addision

Chris Addision

The University of British Columbia
Senior Instructor, Department of Chemistry and Science One ProgramDirector, Science Gateway Programs
avatar for James Charbonneau

James Charbonneau

Assistant Professor of Teaching, University of British Columbia
I'm an Instructor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at UBC and the Associate Director the Science Gateway Programs, which includes Science One and the Coordinated Science Program. I spend most of my time either teaching or thinking about teaching.


Wednesday May 30, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Ballroom 2

3:15pm AKDT

Supporting Student Wellness Through Experiential Learning & Career Mapping
Caring for our students has become extremely complex. Some faculty believe caring for the well being of students is not their role and finding a way to balance this view within a pedagogy of care can be challenging. However, reframing the purpose of our teaching towards knowledge-practice learning can help bridge this philosophical divide.

Millennials are the first generation expected to fare worse than their parents in earnings and life expectancy (Maybrey, 2017). With this in mind it is even possible that the students sitting in our classrooms today will not fare as well as we did. The American College Health Association, Ontario Canada Reference Group (2016) illustrated a dramatic increase in health-related issues, including suicide attempts, between 2013 and 2016 even though during this time there has been an significant increase in campus student service programs. Maybrey’s article suggests that support services alone can not improve student wellness. Poor career preparation and students’ lack of awareness for how their learning connects to the economy is a major contributor to anxieties that lead to a cycle of debt and poor health.

To be well students need hope for their futures (Pardy, 2016). Universities do their best with wellness programs and counselling services, but they are addressing the symptoms and not the root causes. Teaching and learning strategies have the ability to help address the root of this growing problem.

This presentation draws on research, and teaching and learnings strategies to illustrate how experiential learning and reframing how career paths are mapped can dramatically improve student engagement in course content, and at the same time improve overall well being.

The objectives of this presentation are to:
  1. Share findings from “tested” teaching and learning strategies.
  2. Demonstrate career mapping that expands a student’s opportunities and provides faculty with a better way to illustrate career options from their specific area of study to the economy (including humanities, liberal arts, sciences).
  3. Provide examples of resources that support faculty workload and increase experiential learning opportunities for students. 
  4. Facilitate small group discussions to exchange ideas, resources, and promising practices.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Pardy

Linda Pardy

Associate Professor, University of the Fraser Valley
Knowledge Practice and Experiential Learning Innovations in Teaching. Expanding Career Options for Arts Majors. Indigenization: Faculty development for non-Indigenous instructors. Teaching and Learning: Faculty Involvement in Student Development Storytelling: Alternative Notions for... Read More →


Wednesday May 30, 2018 3:15pm - 4:00pm AKDT
Port of New York

4:15pm AKDT

Childcare Closes
Wednesday May 30, 2018 4:15pm - 4:30pm AKDT
- Room 440 (4th Floor)